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Introducing Alpine for Capture One

A few weeks ago when I launched Alpine for Lightroom, a few people wrote to me asking for a Capture One version. After some work and experimentation, I’m happy to announce that I now have a version of Alpine for Capture One. It’s not exactly the same as the Lightroom version due to the differences in how the software works, but it’s broadly similar. 

So what is Alpine? In a nutshell, Alpine for Capture One is a set of “Styles” that is designed to give your RAW images a stylised look. The idea for Alpine was to work with images of forests and mountains, to give the “woodsman” style of effect that is popular certain outdoor magazines. The styles generally work by enhancing the greens and browns in an image and are best suited to photos which contain a lot of these tones. Alpine is also designed to work best with lower contrast images, typically shot on misty or overcast days, although there are also some styles that will be better on sunnier, high contrast images too.

Porting these from Lightroom to Capture One was initially a little more difficult than I was expecting. The reason for this is that some adjustments, while they might have the same names, and broadly do the same thing, actually behave quite differently in different software. The other problem I have is that the starting point for different cameras in Capture One is much more variable than it is in Lightroom.

After a considerable amount of trial and error and tweaking various settings I managed to come up with a set that I was happy with, and captures the essence of the original idea behind Alpine. The Capture One version actually includes a few additional looks that weren’t in the originalLightroom version too, and overall, I think it’s a good package. While it is designed for a fairly narrow set of subjects, the styles should give you a pretty good starting point. 

Alpine for Capture One is available now. the regular price is €10 but for the first two weeks, it will be on sale for just €8 (until July 8th). To learn more about Alpine for Capture One, and to see some samples of the product in action, check out the product pages. This is my second set of Capture One presets, with the first being “Silver Lux”. 

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Presets in Action: Urban Decay in Galway with Industrial Iron

I recently spent some time in Galway city, in the west of Ireland, and while I was there I was taking some photos around the harbour and the railway station. As I was capturing the images, it occurred to me that they had an urban decay feel to them, and I thought they would be perfect for my Industrial Iron set of presets.

Once back in Lightroom, I set about processing and grading the images. I used my Industrial Iron set, and mostly the “Industrial” presets (0-5). the dull day, and overall Industrial gloom of the mages worked really well with the greens and muted tones of the presets to create a sense of almost post apocalyptic (sorry Galway!) feel to the images. Here are some before and after examples:

And here is the finished set of images:

Industrial Iron is available now right here on the store!

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New Black and White Lightroom Preset Bundle Available

New Monochrome Lightroom Preset Bundle Available

I currently have three sets of black and white presets available for Lightroom and based on popular request, I’m now making them available as a single bundle. The three sets of presets are: Monolith, MonoLux and T-Pan. Each has a different style and different approach to creating the black and white look, and together I think they make a good range of styles for creating black and white images in Lightroom.

The bundle contains the following three sets:

Monolith

Monolith is a more stylised set of black and white looks. The results you get from Monolith are typically the high contrast type of black and white Image that’s popular with some street photographers.

MonoLux

MonoLux is a more varied set of styles and is more filmic than Monolith. The set was designed with the aim of creating a rich but natural black and white filmic feel.

T-Pan

T-Pan for Lightroom is a more film like set and is a more subtle look than the other two packs. The look is aiming to re-create the experience of shooting with a professional grade black and white film stock, and creates a rich film like monochrome image.

I think the bundle is a good deal too. It could normally be €28 to buy them all separately, and with this bundle you can get them for just €20, so you’re basically getting one of the sets for free.

(Note that the price includes VAT which can change depending on your country of origin, so the price may vary depending on where you are)

You can see the bundle now here on the digital download store, which also shows some samples and links to the original presets which has more details.

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Introducing T-Pan for Lightroom

T-Pan for Lightroom example

I’m delighted to announce that my first set of new Lightroom Presets for 2017 is now available. It’s called T-Pan and it’s a new set of Black and White Presets. I came up with the style when working on trying to copy the look of some film that a friend had asked me to scan, and I’m pretty happy with the results. T-PAN is an attempt to create a realistic set of monochrome film presets, and it is aiming to re-create the experience of shooting with a professional grade black and white film.

Within the pack there are 10 versions of T-Pan. Each version is it’s now “Film” as such. Unlike some of my previous presets, T-PAN does not require a separate setup preset. The look that has been created uses a camera’s Portrait profile as its starting point, and this has been baked into the presets. There is also a special version of the presets for Fuji X-Trans shooters. This is called T-PAN F. These have the required colour profile already baked into the presets.

Each of the 10 “Film” stocks, in other words each version of the presets, comes with three variations:

T-PAN (Normal) This is the normal Version of the film

T-PAN+ This version s a little brighter, with some shadow recovery, and slightly less grain

T-PAN 400 This is a version of the film styled after ISO400 speed black and white films. It has more contrast and definition than the regular version, but with increased grain.

T-PAN also comes with a set of tools, which consists of a number of faux colour filters for different effects (these don’t colour the image, they’re the equivalent of putting a filter on your lens if shooting with actual film) and a set of additional grain presets, for easy application of different types of grain.

Just a side point of interest. For the Fuji versions, the presets are based on the “Astia” profile. You’re probably wondering why I decided on using Astia rather than one of Fuji’s black and white colour profiles or even Acros? It’s because doing so would not allow the use of faux colour filters which is based on adjusting the black and white mix.

The presets are available now on my Digital Download store. They will normally sell for €8 (price may vary depending on local Taxes) but they’ll be on sale for the launch at just €5

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How To See what Preset You’ve Previously Used in Lightroom

How To See what Preset You've Previously Used in Lightroom

If you’re a Lightroom user and you regularly use Lightroom presets, you may have come across this situation from time to time. You are looking back through some old images or projects, and you come across a photo that you like. You know you used a preset on it but you can’t remember which one. Luckily there’s a really easy way to find out.

First of all, this trick only works if you’re looking at the original file in Lightroom. If you’ve made a virtual copy of the image, and you’re looking at the copy this won’t work. However, if you’re dealing with the original file, here’s what to do:

  1. Go to the Develop Module
  2. On the left hand side of the screen, scroll down the panels, past your presets till you come to the history panel.
  3. Look down through your history. If you’ve applied a preset in the past, it will be listed here in this panel.

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That’s pretty much all there is to it. What I’d really love to see is the ability to search across the history of all images in the library panel in the same way you search for other metadata. Then you could create a smart folder to you images on which you’ve used various Lightroom presets. Unfortunately that’s just a dream for now!

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Behind the scenes of “Alpine”: QuickLux 2 in Action

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I recently posted a short photo essay over on my Photo Journal about some of the lovely images you can get when it’s a dull overcast day. Here’s a short excerpt from what I wrote:

Where I live, we’re sort of in the foothills of the Dublin mountains, and during the summer, sometimes we get a kind of misty cloudy rain, that has a real mountain like feel to it. It reminds me of so many episodes of the X-Files which took place in forest settings of Canada, and it has a real frontier feel to it, even though we’re still just in a superb of the city. I always think of it as “Alpine” weather, even though this is probably just a name I’ve given it myself.

To create the look for this I used my QuickLux 2 Lightroom presets. In fact, it was for this very style of shot that I created some of the presets in QuickLux 2. I shot these set of images with a Sony A6000, and processed them in Lightroom.

The first step was to import them with my A6000 import preset (Available Here). I use this preset to get a better starting point. Once I’d rated and sorted my images I went through them and started applying the presets. Here are a few examples from the photo essay.

Bridge

In this example of a bridge over a stream, I used QNeg-Basic02 from QuickLux 2. Once I applied that, I then tweaked the Dehaze amount using the +DH25 preset that also comes with the set.

Bridge Before - from Alpine - with QuickLux 2Bridge After - Alpine

Before | After

Old Gateway

For this shot I used QTrans-Basic 04 for the shot. That’s pretty much all I did to it. You can see the before and after result below.

Before | After

Walker Sign

For this shot I used QTrans-Basic05 from QuickLux 2. Again, that was all I did to the shot in Lightroom.

Before | After

Old Log

For this shot I went with QNeg-Basic 02. I like this preset as it has the blacks raised a little. I did some additional exposure compensation for this shot.

Before | After


 

Quick LUX 2 Lightroom Presets
QuickLux 2 for Lightroom

These are just a few examples of how I processed the images from this shoot. You can see the full project here, and to learn more about QuickLux 2 visit the product pages here in the store.

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Introducing MonoLux for Lightroom

MonoLux for Lightroom - Virtual Box

MonoLux for Lightroom - Virtual Box

I had stated when I launched Coffee Tones for Lightroom last month, that it was my intent to launch a new set of Lightroom presets every month this year. Well, it was getting close, but it looks like I made it with a few days to spare! I’m happy to announce today, that my newest set, MonoLux for Lightroom is now available.

MonoLux is my second set of black and white presets for Lightroom. The set was designed with the aim of creating a rich but natural black and white filmic feel. Within the pack are 10 variations with some extra special effects presets. This set also comes with separate Grad, Grain and Vignette presets, as well as set-up presets to help speed up you’re workflow.

MonoLux makes use of Lightroom’s dehaze function to add depth to images, and so requires Lightroom CC 2015.1 or higher, or Lightroom 6.1 or higher. In fact, dehaze was integral to the look of the presets, and I think the way that I’ve used it creates an interesting black and white effect. Because the dehaze slider is only in the creative cloud version of Lightroom, I’ve included some presets which will let you adjust the de-haze amount without using the he slider.

[MonoLux is available now for just €5](because the De-haze slider is only in the creative cloud version of Lightroom, I’ve included some presets which will let you adjust the de-haze amount without using the he slider. ) and requires Lightroom 6.1 or CC2015.1 or higher.

In some other store related news, and in the theme of black and white, I’ve put Monolith, my first set of black and white presets, on sale too, with the price reduced to €8 from €15. Many of my other presets are on sale too, with up to 40% off in some cases. Finally, I’m discontinuing my ACR presets, as there simply wasn’t enough demand. For the few people who bought them, you can still get support and re-download them through your accounts, but they are no longer available for sale.

In the mean time, here are some more examples of MonoLux in action. For full details and more samples, stop by the store and check out the product pages for MonoLux.

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Introducing Coffee Tones for Lightroom

coffee-tones-intro-screenshot

I’m happy to announce that my first new set of Lightroom Presets for 2016 is now available. Called “Coffee Tones” the set is, as the name suggests, inspired by the look of coffee. It has a number of looks in both colour and black and white. All have some variation of warm earthy coffee coloured tones.

Coffee Tones is the first of a new set of smaller “mini packs” that I’m planning on releasing this year. Smaller than some of my other presets, it will be available for a very reasonable price of just €5. There are 10 main looks and a few of these come with some variations too. As always, there is extensive documentation included, and you can download the readme file before you buy to see what’s involved if you would like.

Requirements

Unlike my other sets, Coffee Tones requires Lightroom CC 2015.1 or Lightroom 6.1 or higher. The presets make use of Lightroom’s new Dehaze function to add contrast and warmth and so require the newer versions of Lightroom which support dehaze. The best version is the latest version of Lightroom CC as it includes full dehze controls, however, the dehaze function is supported in Lightroom 6.1, but you just don’t get any controls for it.

I know that it’s kind of a pain the way Adobe implemented this with two different versions of Lightroom, but using dehaze is an integral part of these looks, and it is important to the effect. Please make sure you have the correct version of Lightroom before buying Coffee Tones.

Samples

Here are some examples of Coffee Tones in Action. For more samples see the Product Page.

Coffee Tones for Lightroom Available Now!

Coffee Tones for Lightroom is available now for €5. See the product page for more information or to buy the presets.

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Bleached Bronze for Lightroom now Available

BleachedBronzeBox

I’m delighted to announce that Bleached Bronze for Lightroom is now available. Bleached Bronze was one of the very first presets that I made when I first started selling presets for Aperture . Since I stopped selling presets for Aperture, I kept getting requests for a Lightroom version of Bleached bronze. Well, it’s finally here!

Bleached bronze for Lightroom is a set of artistic effect presets for Lightroom, designed to give your images a bronze effect. The idea is to give your images a warm, earthy toned metallic look, while still retaining some colour for a creative, cinematic style.

Incidentally, I had mentioned earlier that it would only be available for Lightroom CC or 6.1, but I re-worked it since then and it should work fine with any version from 5.2 or later

Because it’s a little smaller than some of my other Lightroom sets, it will normally sell for €10 but for the first two weeks it’s only €8. Here are a few examples of Bleached Bronze in use:

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You can see more examples of Bleached Bronze in use over on its product page.

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Vivid Extreme for Lightroom – New Lightroom Presets now Available

I’m delighted to announce that my latest set of develop module presets for Lightroom, “Vivid Extreme” is now available. Vivid Extreme was one of the first set of presets that I had originally made and put on sale for Aperture and I’ve finally brought out a Lightroom version. The idea behind Vivid Extreme is simple. Take the idea of the typical “Vivid” settings in most cameras and push it to the Extreme. I wanted to create a look that wasn’t so much a throwback to the days of film, but instead embraced modern digital imaging. I also wanted to emulate the “high saturation” look that is popular among some artists.

Vivid Extreme comes with a variety of different looks. They were named after the types of images that I was optimising them for when I was developing them, although they will all work reasonably well on different types of images, so the names are more like code-names! The looks also vary in strength for creating degrees of vividness! In some ways, with this set, I was trying to achieve with colour what monolith did for black and white. The pack also includes a set of “Setup” presets designed to set a few things up depending on your camera manufacturer and help speed up your workflow. I’ve also included a set of modifiers, vignettes and a few graduated filters to help bring out punchy skies.

Vivid Extreme is a more focussed and smaller pack than my previous ones, and it doesn’t include the elaborate “Thomas’s Toolbox” so it’s cheaper. It will be €10 but I’m having a special launch sale, so you you can get it for the next two weeks for €8.

Rather than waffle on about it, let me show you what it can do. Here are some examples of Vivid Extreme in use, followed by a “Before and After” video so you can see just how much of an effect it’s having. For more examples see the preset details in the store.

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A Lone Red Tulip

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Before and After:

There are lost more sample images and more details over on the product page.