Posted on

How to use presets on Lightroom Mobile

Adobe recently introduced a new feature for the mobile version of Lightroom CC that people had been requesting for a long time, and that is the ability to use presets. What’s more, they also added preset syncing between the desktop and mobile versions of Lightroom CC. You can now use all of your Lightroom presets, and profiles on your mobile device and the process is fairly simple. You will, however, need to use Lightroom CC on the desktop. You will also need a creative cloud subscription.

If you’re not currently using the desktop version of Lightroom CC (not to be confused with Lightroom Classic) you will need to install it. Even if you don’t intend to use it, you still need to have it installed in order to sync presets to the mobile version. Once you have it installed and setup you’re ready to go. 

Installing presets in Lightroom CC

The first step is to install your presets into Lightroom CC. This requires a different process than Lightroom Classic, but it’s actually a little easier. Here’s what to do:

  1. Open Lightroom CC
  2. Go to the Edit Mode (Press E on your keyboard)
  3. Click on the Presets button at the bottom of the interface.
  4. At the top of the presets panel that appears click on the … menu button, and from the menu choose import presets.
  5. From the open and save dialogue, select the folder of presets that you want to import, and click on “Import”
  6. This will import your presets into Lightroom CC on the desktop. they will now sync over the cloud to your other versions (providing you have an internet connection, obviously)

Applying presets in Lightroom Mobile

Once you have the presets installed, you can now use them on the mobile version of Lightroom, providing you have the latest version and an active subscription. The process is pretty simple but here’s what to do:

  1. On your iPhone, iPad or Android device open Lightroom
  2. Select an image to work on by tapping on it.
  3. Tap on the presets button. This is the second button down on the interface and it looks like two circles intersecting.
  4. if you don’t see your presets immediately, it may take a few moments for them to sync
  5. Simply tap on the preset to preview it.
  6. Tap on the Done button at the bottom of the interface to apply the preset.

Applying a preset to multiple images (a workaround)

Unfortunately there currently is no way to apply a preset to multiple images as there is in Lightroom Classic. There’s also no “apply on import” option or the ability to set defaults. If you want to apply a preset to multiple images you will need to apply it to one and then copy and paste it to others. Alternatively, you can use the previous button. 

To Copy and paste settings, here’s what to do.

  1. Select an image and apply your preset as per the instructions above.
  2. Tap on the … menu at the top of the screen
  3. Select “Copy Settings from the menu”
  4. Select the options that you want to copy. 
  5. Move to another image
  6. Tap on the … menu again
  7. Choose paste settings

To use the “Previous” button. Note the Previous button is the last button on the top right set of controls.

  1. Select an image and apply a preset
  2. Move to another image.
  3. You may need to wait a moment before the previous button becomes available. Once it is no longer greyed out.
  4. Tap on the previous button
  5. Select “Adjustments” to apply just the things that were changed, or All to apply every setting.

That’s all there is to it. I recommend the copy and paste option as this stores the settings in the clipboard, and it doesn’t matter if you make changes to an image, or if you interrupt the process of switching to a new image and applying previous settings.

Don’t forget to check out the latest presets for Lightroom that I have available here on the store!

Posted on

New Creative Profiles Pack for Lightroom and Photoshop

I’m happy to announce that my newest product is now available. It is a set of creative profiles for use with Lightroom (version 7.3 or later) and Photoshop Camera RAW. “Creative Profile Pack One” is a set of 45 creative profiles for Lightroom and Photoshop.

Creative Profiles were introduced in Lightroom 7.3 and are a one-click way to apply a look to your image. Unlike a preset which adjusts the sliders in Lightroom, Creative Profiles behave more like an overall effect, and with a single button, apply all the adjustments. They have the additional advantage of allowing you to adjust the amount of the effect with a single slider. Creative profiles can also equally be applied to both Jpeg and RAW files.

The profiles in this pack are decided into three collections: Film Lux Profiles, TF-Colour and TF-Mono. Some of these are derived from my popular Lightroom presets but have been specially modified and enhanced so that they work better as Profiles.

CP1-Box.jpgFilm Lux Profiles are loosely based on my “Film Lux” presets, and provide an analogue film feel. TF-Colour contains a number of colour effects, including Vivid effects, and Warming and Cooling effects. They contain some looks inspired by my popular Landscape Gold and Bleached Bronze presets. TF-Mono contains a number of black and white profiles.

Creative Pack One is on sale now for €15 but for the rest of the month, it’s on sale for just €12 (until the 31st July). There are full details and some downloadable sample profiles for you to try on the product page.

Posted on

An Update on Lightroom Presets in Version 7.3 and Later

Ever since Adobe updated Lightroom earlier this month and changed the way presets are stored, there has been a lot of confusion around the new system, and I myself have been caught out by this too. In fact, I was so confused by the changes, I mistook one aspect of the new format entirely, and ended up putting out some incorrect information. Luckily a reader set me straight, and so here is the semi-definitive guide to the new preset format.

First of all, if you have upgraded to 7.3, you may want to get the latest point update (released yesterday at the time of writing this) as it fixes some of the bugs that were introduced with 7.3. These were mostly to do with the sorting of presets, but there were a few other bugs too, and this point update is supposed to address those.

Note, if you have any of my presets, and they were installed before you upgraded, then you don’t need to do anything. This information is primarily intended for those who may need to re-install presets at a later date, or are installing them after upgrading to Lightroom 7.3

The new format

In a nutshell, Adobe changed the format that Lightroom presets used from the old .lrtemplate format, which used their own data structure (I think) to a standard .xmp file format. This new format is also shared with Photoshop and Camera Raw, and in fact presets are now shared between the two.

New .xmp presets go into a different location than the old presets, and this new “settings” folder is the same location as you use to store presets for Camera Raw now too. As I said, presets are now shared between Lightroom Classic and Photoshop. The new format also supports some additional things that the old format didn’t. You can now add copyright information for example. The new “creative profiles” that were also announced as part of Lightroom 7.3, also use the same .xmp format and the files go in the same place. In fact, they are a variation of the new preset format. The new files can also have sorting information built into the preset, rather than be based on the folder structure where they’re stored, which I suspect may have been part of the problems with upgrading.

Upgrading & compatibility

It is the process of upgrading older presets that tripped me up at first. I had read from a reliable source that Lightroom only upgraded legacy presets once, at the time of upgrading to 7.3. However, it turns out that this is not the case at all. If you install new legacy .lrtemplate presets, Lightroom will detect the new presets and upgrade these the next time you launch Lightroom. This means that older presets remain compatible, at least for now.

Screenshot 2018-04-25 12.51.38.jpg

So, if you want to install legacy .lrtemplate presets, you can do so, just as you used to. You install them into the original preset destination, and then when you relaunch Lightroom, it will run through the upgrade process again.

I had kind of panicked when this release came out as I thought all my presets would be incompatible, but it turns out I was worrying over nothing. They should all still work as before, with the only difference being the upgrading step which happens automatically.

Mixing new and old presets

If you are installing both new and old presets, then you need to make sure that you put them into the right location. So here is a handy diagram to help you make sure you put the right ones in the right place.

The root folder location for this diagram (below) is different on windows and macOS. The simplest way to get to this is to open Lightroom, then go to preferences -> presets and click on the show presets button. This will open the Lightroom folder. You need to go up one level in the hierarchy to get to the root Adobe folder. Or you can go to the location directly in either the finder or windows explorer.

Mac: ~/Library/Application Support/Adobe/ PC: C:\ProgramData\Adobe\

To go to a specific folder on a Mac, from the Finder menu choose Go > Go To Folder…

lr presets.jpg
Posted on

Compatibility of my Lightroom Products with Lightroom Classic and Lightroom CC

Major new versions of Lightroom were recently released, and the Lightroom family now consists of two Applications: Lightroom CC and Lightroom Classic. Lightroom classic is the new name for the previous version of Lightroom, and Lightroom CC is a new desktop version of the mobile and cloud version of Lightroom. As many of my products contain Lightroom presets, including the actual Lightroom preset packs that I sell, I wanted to outline the current state of compatibility with the new versions of Lightroom, and give an outline of future plans.

Lightroom Presets and Compatibility with Lightroom Classic

All of my presets of are compatible with Lightroom Classic with one minor issue. This includes any presets included with any of my guides.

The one issue is that the presets currently set the process version. This was done to ensure that they wouldn’t use an older version which wouldn’t have the necessary features, and was the recommended way of saving presets. However now that there is a new process version (Version 4) and applying any of my presets at current will set the image to the older (Version 3). It should be noted that the changes in version 4, according to Adobe are to do with performance issues, and so the change will not affect your images visually.

If you’re using my presets, and they set the process version to 3, and you want to change it back to the current process version after applying there are three ways to do this:

  1. Manually change it in the calibration panel of the Develop module
  2. If you have the older process version applied, you will see a little lightening bolt icon on the histogram panel in the develop module. Clicking on this will bring up a dialog box asking you if you want to upgrade. This will also ask you if you want to upgrade all the images on the filmstrip.
  3. You can batch upgrade lots of Images by going to the library module, selecting the images and choosing Photo > Develop Settings > Update to current process

I will be rolling out updates to the existing presets over the coming weeks that remove the explicit setting of the process version. I will be updating the presets that come with my guides first, and then stand alone presets. However, I also plan to discontinue some of my older presets, so some of the very old ones won’t be updated, unless there is significant demand. They will all still work, but just you will just need to manually upgrade the process version.

Lightroom Presets and compatibility with Lightroom CC

Lightroom CC can use presets too, however there are a few key features missing from Lightroom CC which means that I can’t guarantee compatibility at this stage. Specifically, Lightroom CC does not include the ability to change the colour profile, but you can change it by using presets.

It is also lacking some of the grain controls. However, in general look presets should work, and sharpening presets should work too.

To install presets into Lightroom CC do the following

  1. Launch Lightroom CC
  2. Select any Image and go to the develop mode
  3. Click on the presets button
  4. From the … menu at the top of the presets panel, choose: “Open Presets Folder”
  5. This should open the folder, either in the Finder on the Mac, or Windows Explorer on Windows.
  6. Copy your presets in here.
  7. Restart Lightroom CC

Roadmap

I am planning to upgrade the presets that come with my guides as a priority. This may take a little time, as I need to do multiple checks to make sure everything works and so on.

The Fuji sharpening presets will also be updated, as will f-Variations, however, as these are free they will be last to be updated

For my standalone Lightroom preset packs, I will endeavour to update these as soon as possible, however I am discontinuing older preset packs in the next little while.

[UPDATE] I’ve now updated all the presets to remove explicit references to the process version, so if you want to update, you can re-download them from your account. See here for more details.

Posted on

Autumn Lightroom Preset Sale: 50% off selected Preset Pack

To celebrate the arrival of Autumn, I’m putting a selection of my Lightroom Presets down to half price. This includes “Landscape Gold”, which started life as a way to enhance Autumn images, and is great for enhancing the warm tones in your pictures.

Also reduced to half price are Film Candy 1 and 2 which are special effects presets, designed to create a vintage, or expired film look. Previously €15 they are now just €7. Finally, Vivid Extreme and QuickLux one are now just €5 each, also down to half price (or even less in the case of QuickLux.)

This sale will run throughout September. You can see all the products currently on sale here.

Posted on

FilmLUX 2 Now Available

I’m delighted to announce that my latest set of Lightroom Presets, FilmLUX 2 is now available. FilmLUX 2 was designed to create a subtle “film” like look to digital images, without them looking overly processed. With many presets, and even when processing manually, it can be easy to take your images too far and have them look like they’ve been heavily treated. With FilmLUX 2 I wanted to create a set of looks, that could enhance an image without it looking like you’ve done an extensive amount of work to it. while the images will still look treated, the effect won’t be too extreme.

There are twenty five different “looks’ in FilmLUX 2 and they are broken into three categories. There are five “chrome” like looks, which are based on an older type of transparency film, and have a reduced saturation for an aged effect. Secondly, there are ten “Vivid” style looks. With these, I wanted to create a vivid look that wasn’t too oversaturated, and still looked relatively natural. They also have a film like curve, ad tend to brighten the image a little, for that slightly pushed film look. Finally, there are ten “negative” effects. These have reduced saturation, raised blacks and a subtle roll off not he whites for a softer look. Each of the 25 main looks comes in two variations, one with grain (marked with a +G) and one without grain.

Here are some examples of FilmLUX2 in action:

FilmLUX 2 is available now for the special launch price of €8 (Normal price will be €10) Price depends on your local VAT rate. For full details and some more examples see the product pages on the store.

Posted on

My Presets in Action: Cherry Blossoms & Film Lux

As spring is here once again, the Cherry Blossoms are blooming, and I just love the beauty of these fleeting flowers. On a beautiful sunny day I was in a local park here in Dublin and I was taking some images of the beautiful cherry trees there. I also recorded the shoot and created a video of the session in action which you can find on my YouTube channel.

I shot the photos using a Fuji X-Pro 2 and for post processing, I wanted to go with a nice film look, and so, after trying out a few different presets, I eventually settled on using my own FilmLUX set as my starting point. But first, let me back up a bit. I actually pre-processed the files with the excellent Iridient X-Transformer first, converting them to DNG. When using DNGs created with X-Transformer, the resulting files behave exactly like RAW files, and so can be used with any preset. On import, I used the “Provia” colour profile as my base setting.

After going through the images from the shoot, I picked the ones I wanted to work on, and then I started editing in the develop module in Lightroom. I selected “FL-Film Base Slide 01” from FilmLUX as the starting point. Once I applied that I did some additional tweaking. This was mostly just to adjust the exposure slightly or the highlight and shadow recovery.

As I wanted them all to have the same feel to them, and be part of a series, I went through each image from my selects, and used the “Previous” button in Lightroom to apply the settings from he previous photo, and then did some minot tweaking for each shot. Using this method I was able to quickly process the whole shoot.

Here are some of the photos that I took that day, processed using FilmLUX. You can find out more about FilmLUX here.

 

Film Lux Lightroom Presets

Posted on

Free Sample Pack of My Lightroom Presets

I have lots of Lightroom Presets available now on this store and I wanted to be able to give you a way to try some of them out, so I’ve put together a collection of presets taken from the various sets, to make a free sample pack.

This free set contains 20 Lightroom Presets selected from my different preset packs, so you can get a taste for the presets that I make.

The Presets Included are:

  • BleachedBronze: BleachedBronze02
  • BleachedBronze: BleachedBronze05-FadedBlue
  • Coffee Tones: Expresso
  • Film Lux: FL-Film Base-Slide 02
  • Film Lux: FL-Film-Base-Negative-02
  • Film Candy 2: Film Candy 2 – QTrans-Basic01
  • Film Candy 2: Film Candy 2 QNeg-Basic02
  • Film Candy: Film-Candy-Marshmallow
  • Film Candy: Film-Candy-Plain Chocolate DR
  • Landscape Gold: Landscape Gold 14ct Lite +V
  • Landscape Gold: Landscape Gold 9ct Medium
  • Monolith: Monolith 12 – Faces
  • QuickLux: Quick Lux – FL-Film Base Slide 01
  • Steely Blue: Steely Blue Lite
  • Steely Blue: Steely Blue Polarised V
  • T-Pan: T-PAN01
  • T-Pan: T-PAN02 400
  • Vivid Extreme: Vivid Cityscape Blue
  • Vivid Extreme: Vivid Texture
  • MonoLux: MonoLux 4 – Flesh Tones

If you’ve been curious about my Lightroom presets before, but wanted to get a taste before buying, I’m happy to oblige. I had actually been wanting to do this for some time, but I’m only getting around to it now. You can get the free sample pack from my store, as well as see more information about what’s included.

Posted on

New Black and White Lightroom Preset Bundle Available

New Monochrome Lightroom Preset Bundle Available

I currently have three sets of black and white presets available for Lightroom and based on popular request, I’m now making them available as a single bundle. The three sets of presets are: Monolith, MonoLux and T-Pan. Each has a different style and different approach to creating the black and white look, and together I think they make a good range of styles for creating black and white images in Lightroom.

The bundle contains the following three sets:

Monolith

Monolith is a more stylised set of black and white looks. The results you get from Monolith are typically the high contrast type of black and white Image that’s popular with some street photographers.

MonoLux

MonoLux is a more varied set of styles and is more filmic than Monolith. The set was designed with the aim of creating a rich but natural black and white filmic feel.

T-Pan

T-Pan for Lightroom is a more film like set and is a more subtle look than the other two packs. The look is aiming to re-create the experience of shooting with a professional grade black and white film stock, and creates a rich film like monochrome image.

I think the bundle is a good deal too. It could normally be €28 to buy them all separately, and with this bundle you can get them for just €20, so you’re basically getting one of the sets for free.

(Note that the price includes VAT which can change depending on your country of origin, so the price may vary depending on where you are)

You can see the bundle now here on the digital download store, which also shows some samples and links to the original presets which has more details.

Posted on

Introducing T-Pan for Lightroom

T-Pan for Lightroom example

I’m delighted to announce that my first set of new Lightroom Presets for 2017 is now available. It’s called T-Pan and it’s a new set of Black and White Presets. I came up with the style when working on trying to copy the look of some film that a friend had asked me to scan, and I’m pretty happy with the results. T-PAN is an attempt to create a realistic set of monochrome film presets, and it is aiming to re-create the experience of shooting with a professional grade black and white film.

Within the pack there are 10 versions of T-Pan. Each version is it’s now “Film” as such. Unlike some of my previous presets, T-PAN does not require a separate setup preset. The look that has been created uses a camera’s Portrait profile as its starting point, and this has been baked into the presets. There is also a special version of the presets for Fuji X-Trans shooters. This is called T-PAN F. These have the required colour profile already baked into the presets.

Each of the 10 “Film” stocks, in other words each version of the presets, comes with three variations:

T-PAN (Normal) This is the normal Version of the film

T-PAN+ This version s a little brighter, with some shadow recovery, and slightly less grain

T-PAN 400 This is a version of the film styled after ISO400 speed black and white films. It has more contrast and definition than the regular version, but with increased grain.

T-PAN also comes with a set of tools, which consists of a number of faux colour filters for different effects (these don’t colour the image, they’re the equivalent of putting a filter on your lens if shooting with actual film) and a set of additional grain presets, for easy application of different types of grain.

Just a side point of interest. For the Fuji versions, the presets are based on the “Astia” profile. You’re probably wondering why I decided on using Astia rather than one of Fuji’s black and white colour profiles or even Acros? It’s because doing so would not allow the use of faux colour filters which is based on adjusting the black and white mix.

The presets are available now on my Digital Download store. They will normally sell for €8 (price may vary depending on local Taxes) but they’ll be on sale for the launch at just €5

Posted on

Sony A6000 Post Processing Guide for Lightroom Now Available

I’m very pleased to announce, that after a very long time in production, my newest guide is now available. this e-book guide is called “Processing Sony A6000 Raw files in Lightroom: A Workflow and settings guide”. While that’s probably a bit of a mouthful, it pretty much sums up what this new guide is about. In the same way that I have previously written guides for Fuji X-Series shooters, this guide is designed specifically for Sony A6000 shooters who want to get the best from their camera when processing their images in Lightroom.

While working with Sony RAW files in Lightroom may seem like a fairly straightforward process, there are lots of things that you can do to optimise your workflow. This guide will look at all these things, and give you the knowledge you need to get the best from your Sony RAW files, no matter what the situation.

This guide also includes a set of develop module presets for Lightroom. These cover some of the subjects and settings that are covered in the guide.

What’s it all about then?

The guide is 58 pages long and here’s a breakdown of what topics are covered in the guide, by chapter:

Chapter 1: RAW vs JPEG vs RAW + JPEG

The A6000 will let you shoot in three different formats. You can choose to shoot just JPEGs, just RAW files, or RAW and JPEG. In this chapter I discuss the merits of shooting RAW + JPEG and I discuss workflows for managing both in Lightroom. I also briefly discuss Sony’s compressed raw format and some of the controversy surrounding it

Chapter 2: Setting Basic Settings and Creating an Import Preset

If you’re shooting RAW files with the A6000, you may be disappointed when you first import them into Lightroom, especially if you’ve been looking at the JPEG output on your camera. The reason for this is that JPEG files have the contrast, colour settings and so on baked into the file.

There are ways to minimise this discrepancy, and that’s what this chapter is about. By creating a basic setup that sets a “base level” for your RAW files, it will save you a lot of work in the future and it will also mean that your images look better out of the camera when you first import them into Lightroom. With a few tweaks, you should see a big difference.

In this section I’m going to show you what to change to create a default setup, and how to save those changes as a preset to apply to imports in the future. I’m also going to show you the settings I use and recommend, which are included with this guide as a preset that you can try for yourself.

Chapter 3: Fixing Common Problems

In this chapter I look at how to address a number of issues that commonly crop up when processing RAW files from the Sony A6000. While many of these topics are common to all cameras, this chapter will approach the subject with a focus on how they affect images taken with the A6000 specifically.

Chapter 3 looks at the following issues that can occur with your images and ways to approach dealing with those problems:

• Correcting white balance and how white balance affects images.

• Tinting shadows and highlights.

• Fixing colour fringing.

• Manually setting distortion options.

• Fixing banding.

• Fixing shadow noise with photoshop.

Chapter 4: Creative Adjustments

In this chapter we look at some of the ways that you can creatively adjust your images in Lightroom. While this could be a book all of its own, we focus on some of the adjustments that you can make to match the in-camera options. In particular we look at creating black and white images, matching the adjustments available for the picture controls, and expanding the dynamic range, similar to the camera’s DRO settings. We also discuss shooting and processing HDR Images.

Processing Sony A6000 Raw files in Lightroom: A Workflow and settings guide is available now for just €5 and for the first two weeks it will be at a special launch price of just €4. The guide is in PDF format and also contains some presets.

For more details see the full product description here in the digital download store. You can also download a sample PDF of the first chapter.

[edgtf_button size=”medium” type=”outline” text=”Buy Now” custom_class=”” icon_pack=”font_awesome” fa_icon=”” link=”https://store.thomasfitzgeraldphotography.com/product/processing-sony-a6000-raw-files-in-lightroom/” target=”_self” color=”” hover_color=”” background_color=”” hover_background_color=”” border_color=”” hover_border_color=”” font_size=”” font_weight=”” margin=””]

Posted on

F-Variations for Lightroom: Free Lightroom Presets for Fuji X-Series users

I’ve created a new set of presets for Fuji users and I’m happy to announce that I’m giving these away for free. Basically, I really like the various film simulation modes available on Fuji’s cameras, and the corresponding picture profiles in Lightroom. They’re good on their own, but they also make a good starting point for some further manipulation. So, using the various profiles as a starting point, I created my own set of “Variations” of these.

I first got the idea, when I created some variations of classic chrome. I added some contrast, clarity and so on, and did some curves tweaks, to create an enhanced version of classic chrome. When I did this, I then made a few more versions, and that was the start of it. I then did the same to many of the other modes, and ended up with a large collection of presets. I’m pretty happy with them too. Some are just adding extra “oomph” while others use film simulation techniques, and offer things like fading and tinting.

Free Lightroom Presets for Fuji Users Free Lightroom Presets for Fuji Users Free Lightroom Presets for Fuji Users _DSF3433

One word of warning though. Some of these presets will only work if you’re shooting with a camera that supports the corresponding film simulation mode. For example, to use the “Chrome” presets, your Fuji camera must support the “Classic Chrome” preset. Similarly, to use one of the Acros variations, your camera must support the Acros simulation mode (currently only the X-Pro 2 and the X-T2). These presets will not enable Classic Chrome or Acros on raw files from cameras that don’t support it.

Anyway, These are available now from here on the store, and they’re completely free. I hope you enjoy them, and please spread the word.

One thing I would ask, if you are sharing them, please share the link to the store page, and not the actual download. They are free, but they’re still my work and they’re still copyright.

Also, as these presets are offered for free we offer no support for their installation or use. However we do have an extensive set of Support documents and FAQ on our Help Centre page.

F-Variations - Free Lightroom Presets for Fuji X Users