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Fuji Capture One Guide Updated with Support For Capture One 20

Fuji Capture One guide Hero Image

I’ve updated my Fuji Capture One guide to include preliminary support for Capture One 20. If you are a Fuji shooter using Capture One, the new version of my eBook now contains support for both Capture One 12 and Capture One 20.

There are actually only a few things that you need to know regarding version 20 that are different from the previous edition, and so, I’ve added these as options where appropriate. The biggest change regards the new redesigned HDR tool, as this affects the instructions in the guide about matching the shadow and highlight tone options, and the in camera dynamic range. I wanted to keep compatibility with Capture One 12 as well, so if you haven’t updated the software, the guide is still compatible.

In addition to adding preliminary support for Capture One 20, the update also fixes some typos, and adds language to indicate that the advice in the guide book also applies to the non-X-trans cameras, such as Fuji’s medium format GFX series, or the XA series. This brings the version number of the guide to 1.1. Note: The supplied presets have not been changed, so if you have already installed these from a previous version of the guide, you don’t need to re-install.

If you already own the guide, the update is free and is available now from your account. If you’re unsure how to re-download your previous purchases, you can find out how on this support article.

For new users, there will be a small price increase in January, but for now, I’ve put it on sale at the original price. The book covers how to get the best results when using Capture One with Fuji raw files, and covers things like sharpening, noise reduction, setting Fuji film simulation modes and so on. You can find out more about the Fuji Capture One guide on my digital download store.

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Why I Recommend Capture One for Fuji Shooters

A Screenshot of Capture One

This is an edited excerpt from my new Capture One Fuji Guide

For photographers shooting with Fuji cameras, getting the best from your camera’s RAW files can sometimes seem like a challenge, especially if you’ve been mostly using Lightroom. Because of the way Lightroom converts Fuji RAW files, there can often be smearing of fine detail, leading to a water colour effect, as well as issues with strange “worm” like artifacting in areas of solid colour. While not everyone is bothered by these issues, for many, it is a reason to consider other methods of converting RAW files. 

False detail and smearing of fine detail in Lightroom, compared to clean detail in Capture One

This is where Capture One comes in. Capture One is a very powerful image editor in its own right. In earlier versions it was primarily considered a tool for high end medium format cameras, but over the years it has become more mainstream and is one of the primary challengers to Lightroom in the photo workflow space. For Fuji shooters, Capture One uses a different engine that doesn’t suffer the same artefacts that Lightroom does when converting Fuji X-Trans files. While there are workarounds for Lightroom that help improve or solve the rendering of X-Trans files in Lightroom, such as using X-Transformer or the recently released “Enhanced Details” functionality, both of these options require the creation of an additional DNG file. With Capture One, you get the full quality without having to go to this extra step.

But this isn’t the only reason one might consider using Capture One. If you’re using one of the GFX series of cameras, or if you’re using one of the non X-Trans fuji cameras, it works perfectly with those also. The software has many other advantages too with a pretty sophisticated toolset, including some advanced colour tools, layers and many more features that make it a powerful photography application.

Capture One has supported Fuji cameras for a while, but with version 12, that support is taken to a new level. Version 12 of the application increases compatibility with Fuji RAW files, in part thanks to a collaboration with Fujifilm. This has also brought support for Fuji’s medium format cameras, as well as official Fuji film simulation modes for selected models. This, coupled with an extensive toolset, gives Fuji shooters a powerful alternative for processing Fuji RAW files. 

Capture One Versions

There are a number of different version of Capture One available, some of the features vary slightly depending on the version. Most of the information in this guide is written for the Pro versions of Capture One, whether that is the Fuji specific version or the full version. 

Capture One Pro

This is the standard “Pro”version of Capture One. It offers all the available tools, and it will work with all supported cameras. It is available as both a perpetual licence and as a subscription.

Capture One Pro Fuji Version

This is a version of Capture One Pro specifically for Fuji shooters. This has the full feature set of Capture One, but is limited to working with supported Fujifilm cameras. 

Capture One Express Fuji Version

This is the free cut-down version of Capture One. It still offers the same RAW processing engine, and Fujifilm support but its features are significantly limited compared to the full version of the software. 


If you’re a Fuji Shooter considering Capture One, it’s now my go-to editor for working with Fuji files. If you want to learn how to get the best from processing Fuji RAW files in Capture One then check out my new guide. If you’re thinking of switching to Capture One, I have a good blog post on what to expect

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All of my Fuji Guides have now been updated for 2019

Fuji X-Trans Processing Guides

Over the past few months I’ve been busy bringing all of my current Fuji guides up to date for 2019. This included free updates to three of the guides, and one new edition. The exception is my old Iridient Developer guide, which I will no longer be supporting (more on that below)

Over the course of the time since I first wrote these guides, there have been various changes, and for the most part I’ve provided free updates to those.

My Fuji Lightroom Guide, Fuji Jpeg Guide, and X-Transformer Guide have all received free updates over the past couple of months, I’ve yo’ve purchased any of these before 2019 and missed the update notification, check to see that you have the latest versions.

In addition, I released a new guide for Capture One. The old guide was discontinued some months ago, and the new guide is a rewrite and a significant change. It’s available now, and is currently at version 1.0

Future update plans

As with all things, my plans for future versions of these guides depends on a number of factors, including the development of software etc. For now though, here is a rough guide to what I have in mind:

  • Fuji Lightroom Guide: This will probably no longer get free updates, and a 2nd edition is in the planning stage. I have no time frame for this yet, but hopefully some time this year (2019).
  • Fuji Jpeg Guide: This will continue to receive free updates.
  • X-Transformer Guide: This will depend on future updates to the software itself. I am considering combining this with the Lightroom guide for its second edition.
  • Capture One Guide: As this is only just released, I will continue to provide free updates as long as it makes sense to do so. This will depend on how many changes there are in version 13, but unless there are major changes, I will continue to update it through the 13 release cycle. This may change if version 13 is significantly different, or affects the information in the guide.

Iridient Developer Guide – No longer being updated (for now)

My Iridient Developer guide is no longer being updated. The reason for this is that there has been a significant falloff in interest in this over the past year and also there has been a significant amount of time since the software has been updated. If there is a major 4.0 release of the software, I may reconsider, and do a new version, but if so it will be a second edition and not a free update. I will continue to make the eBook available, and I’ve reduced the price to €3 for the rest of the year at least, and then see what happens in 2020.