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Presets in Action: Enhancing the mood, Creating Filmic Black & White with T-Pan for Lightroom

Howth in Black and White with T-Pan for Lightroom

A little while ago I got up early in the morning and headed to a little fishing town just north of Dublin to get some morning shots of the sleepy port coming to life. I had originally hoped that it would be a nice bright morning, and that I would capture the early rays of the sun over the sea and the harbour, but instead a thick cloud was down, and it was beginning to rain.

I wasn’t disappointed though, I was actually happy, because the result was a really moody light. I got a great sequence of shots of the port waking up, and fishermen leaving to go about their day’s work.

When I got back to the studio and started processing the photos, I actually tried a couple of themes. With the moody light, and rich blue of the morning, I started by using some looks from my QickLux2 set. I created a whole sequence using these looks, but while experimenting, I also wanted to try some black and whites. When I started going through my presets, I realised that I was getting a really filmic look with T-Pan, and so I ended up creating a set with that too.

I originally created T-Pan to be as close to film as possible, but sometimes it works better than others. It depends a lot on the source material, and in this case I think it works out really well. For some of the shots, it actually makes them look almost like they were taken years ago.

Tip: One of the tricks to make something look more film-like when using film presets in Lightroom is to turn the sharpening off. Some presets have this baked in, but I kept the sharpening untouched with T-Pan. So, if you want to add a little of the film like softness, turn your sharpening off. The grain will add a sense of sharpness anyway.

Below is the sequence I created, as well as a couple of before and after shots:

T-Pan is available now from here on the store, both stand alone and as part of my black and white presets bundle.

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Monochrome Lightroom Preset Bundle BoxT-Pan for Lightroom - Lightroom Presets - Virtual Box

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Presets in Action: Urban Decay in Galway with Industrial Iron

I recently spent some time in Galway city, in the west of Ireland, and while I was there I was taking some photos around the harbour and the railway station. As I was capturing the images, it occurred to me that they had an urban decay feel to them, and I thought they would be perfect for my Industrial Iron set of presets.

Once back in Lightroom, I set about processing and grading the images. I used my Industrial Iron set, and mostly the “Industrial” presets (0-5). the dull day, and overall Industrial gloom of the mages worked really well with the greens and muted tones of the presets to create a sense of almost post apocalyptic (sorry Galway!) feel to the images. Here are some before and after examples:

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And here is the finished set of images:

Industrial Iron is available now right here on the store!

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My Presets in Action: Cherry Blossoms & Film Lux

As spring is here once again, the Cherry Blossoms are blooming, and I just love the beauty of these fleeting flowers. On a beautiful sunny day I was in a local park here in Dublin and I was taking some images of the beautiful cherry trees there. I also recorded the shoot and created a video of the session in action which you can find on my YouTube channel.

I shot the photos using a Fuji X-Pro 2 and for post processing, I wanted to go with a nice film look, and so, after trying out a few different presets, I eventually settled on using my own FilmLUX set as my starting point. But first, let me back up a bit. I actually pre-processed the files with the excellent Iridient X-Transformer first, converting them to DNG. When using DNGs created with X-Transformer, the resulting files behave exactly like RAW files, and so can be used with any preset. On import, I used the “Provia” colour profile as my base setting.

After going through the images from the shoot, I picked the ones I wanted to work on, and then I started editing in the develop module in Lightroom. I selected “FL-Film Base Slide 01” from FilmLUX as the starting point. Once I applied that I did some additional tweaking. This was mostly just to adjust the exposure slightly or the highlight and shadow recovery.

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As I wanted them all to have the same feel to them, and be part of a series, I went through each image from my selects, and used the “Previous” button in Lightroom to apply the settings from he previous photo, and then did some minot tweaking for each shot. Using this method I was able to quickly process the whole shoot.

Here are some of the photos that I took that day, processed using FilmLUX. You can find out more about FilmLUX here.

 

Film Lux Lightroom Presets

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Behind the scenes of “Alpine”: QuickLux 2 in Action

Alpine-After-7

I recently posted a short photo essay over on my Photo Journal about some of the lovely images you can get when it’s a dull overcast day. Here’s a short excerpt from what I wrote:

Where I live, we’re sort of in the foothills of the Dublin mountains, and during the summer, sometimes we get a kind of misty cloudy rain, that has a real mountain like feel to it. It reminds me of so many episodes of the X-Files which took place in forest settings of Canada, and it has a real frontier feel to it, even though we’re still just in a superb of the city. I always think of it as “Alpine” weather, even though this is probably just a name I’ve given it myself.

To create the look for this I used my QuickLux 2 Lightroom presets. In fact, it was for this very style of shot that I created some of the presets in QuickLux 2. I shot these set of images with a Sony A6000, and processed them in Lightroom.

The first step was to import them with my A6000 import preset (Available Here). I use this preset to get a better starting point. Once I’d rated and sorted my images I went through them and started applying the presets. Here are a few examples from the photo essay.

Bridge

In this example of a bridge over a stream, I used QNeg-Basic02 from QuickLux 2. Once I applied that, I then tweaked the Dehaze amount using the +DH25 preset that also comes with the set.

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Before | After

Old Gateway

For this shot I used QTrans-Basic 04 for the shot. That’s pretty much all I did to it. You can see the before and after result below.

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Before | After

Walker Sign

For this shot I used QTrans-Basic05 from QuickLux 2. Again, that was all I did to the shot in Lightroom.

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Before | After

Old Log

For this shot I went with QNeg-Basic 02. I like this preset as it has the blacks raised a little. I did some additional exposure compensation for this shot.

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Before | After


 

Quick LUX 2 Lightroom Presets
QuickLux 2 for Lightroom

These are just a few examples of how I processed the images from this shoot. You can see the full project here, and to learn more about QuickLux 2 visit the product pages here in the store.