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An Important Note about Secure Customer Authentication

On the 14th of September a new EU wide directive will come into force regulating online transactions inside the EU. Basically, Secure Customer Authentication, or SCA will require that online transactions will require two factor authentication. This means that any online store has to support this in order to continue to take orders. This store is already set up for this, and it may already be in effect.

So what does this mean?

Basically when you go to check out, at the payment stage, your bank will require an additional layer of authentication in order to authorise the payment. This can be anything from a code the bank texts to you, to authentication through a smartphone app. An example of this that has been in place for sometime is 3d secure.

This takes place between you and your bank and is provided by your credit or debit card provider. The authentication is not actually directly part of this store, but rather comes from your payment provider, and is handled by the payment processors that I use on the site, which are Stripe and PayPal. The stated idea of this is to make payments more secure and reduce fraud.

While I appreciate that many people will be frustrated by an additional layer of interaction when making a purchase, it is completely out of my hands. It is a required law, and is done at the payment processor stage, not by the website. However, to add a wrinkle to this, some payments are exempt and some will be automatically allowed, so the user experience may well be different depending on your bank and the cost of the order. Orders below €30 may be exempt, and in this case you shouldn’t see any difference, but this is up to the payment providers to decide. It’s important to note, that this isn’t just for my store, or similar stores, it’s for any online transaction inside the EU.

The upshot of all this is that if you’re purchasing from this store, you may get an additional pop-up from your bank at the payment stage. Your own bank should have details of this too. If you are outside the EU it is unclear how this will affect you. It is supposed to affect users whenever one end of a transaction is in the EU, however, with PayPal, it’s not clear, as they may consider PayPal one end of the transaction. Critics of this new law are concerned that it will affect online sales in Europe, and I can understand the concern. I am curious to see if it has a majorly negative effect on my sales.

I do apologise for the extra hassle, although, as I said its out of my hands. I regularly get people complaining at even having to enter the standard legally required information, so I assume the same people will be extra frustrated at this. While this is currently an EU thing it should be noted that several other countries outside the EU are considering similar legislation.

For more Information, here is a good article from Visa explaining what SCA is and how it will affect you.

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Why I Recommend Capture One for Fuji Shooters

A Screenshot of Capture One

This is an edited excerpt from my new Capture One Fuji Guide

For photographers shooting with Fuji cameras, getting the best from your camera’s RAW files can sometimes seem like a challenge, especially if you’ve been mostly using Lightroom. Because of the way Lightroom converts Fuji RAW files, there can often be smearing of fine detail, leading to a water colour effect, as well as issues with strange “worm” like artifacting in areas of solid colour. While not everyone is bothered by these issues, for many, it is a reason to consider other methods of converting RAW files. 

False detail and smearing of fine detail in Lightroom, compared to clean detail in Capture One

This is where Capture One comes in. Capture One is a very powerful image editor in its own right. In earlier versions it was primarily considered a tool for high end medium format cameras, but over the years it has become more mainstream and is one of the primary challengers to Lightroom in the photo workflow space. For Fuji shooters, Capture One uses a different engine that doesn’t suffer the same artefacts that Lightroom does when converting Fuji X-Trans files. While there are workarounds for Lightroom that help improve or solve the rendering of X-Trans files in Lightroom, such as using X-Transformer or the recently released “Enhanced Details” functionality, both of these options require the creation of an additional DNG file. With Capture One, you get the full quality without having to go to this extra step.

But this isn’t the only reason one might consider using Capture One. If you’re using one of the GFX series of cameras, or if you’re using one of the non X-Trans fuji cameras, it works perfectly with those also. The software has many other advantages too with a pretty sophisticated toolset, including some advanced colour tools, layers and many more features that make it a powerful photography application.

Capture One has supported Fuji cameras for a while, but with version 12, that support is taken to a new level. Version 12 of the application increases compatibility with Fuji RAW files, in part thanks to a collaboration with Fujifilm. This has also brought support for Fuji’s medium format cameras, as well as official Fuji film simulation modes for selected models. This, coupled with an extensive toolset, gives Fuji shooters a powerful alternative for processing Fuji RAW files. 

Capture One Versions

There are a number of different version of Capture One available, some of the features vary slightly depending on the version. Most of the information in this guide is written for the Pro versions of Capture One, whether that is the Fuji specific version or the full version. 

Capture One Pro

This is the standard “Pro”version of Capture One. It offers all the available tools, and it will work with all supported cameras. It is available as both a perpetual licence and as a subscription.

Capture One Pro Fuji Version

This is a version of Capture One Pro specifically for Fuji shooters. This has the full feature set of Capture One, but is limited to working with supported Fujifilm cameras. 

Capture One Express Fuji Version

This is the free cut-down version of Capture One. It still offers the same RAW processing engine, and Fujifilm support but its features are significantly limited compared to the full version of the software. 


If you’re a Fuji Shooter considering Capture One, it’s now my go-to editor for working with Fuji files. If you want to learn how to get the best from processing Fuji RAW files in Capture One then check out my new guide. If you’re thinking of switching to Capture One, I have a good blog post on what to expect

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All of my Fuji Guides have now been updated for 2019

Fuji X-Trans Processing Guides

Over the past few months I’ve been busy bringing all of my current Fuji guides up to date for 2019. This included free updates to three of the guides, and one new edition. The exception is my old Iridient Developer guide, which I will no longer be supporting (more on that below)

Over the course of the time since I first wrote these guides, there have been various changes, and for the most part I’ve provided free updates to those.

My Fuji Lightroom Guide, Fuji Jpeg Guide, and X-Transformer Guide have all received free updates over the past couple of months, I’ve yo’ve purchased any of these before 2019 and missed the update notification, check to see that you have the latest versions.

In addition, I released a new guide for Capture One. The old guide was discontinued some months ago, and the new guide is a rewrite and a significant change. It’s available now, and is currently at version 1.0

Future update plans

As with all things, my plans for future versions of these guides depends on a number of factors, including the development of software etc. For now though, here is a rough guide to what I have in mind:

  • Fuji Lightroom Guide: This will probably no longer get free updates, and a 2nd edition is in the planning stage. I have no time frame for this yet, but hopefully some time this year (2019).
  • Fuji Jpeg Guide: This will continue to receive free updates.
  • X-Transformer Guide: This will depend on future updates to the software itself. I am considering combining this with the Lightroom guide for its second edition.
  • Capture One Guide: As this is only just released, I will continue to provide free updates as long as it makes sense to do so. This will depend on how many changes there are in version 13, but unless there are major changes, I will continue to update it through the 13 release cycle. This may change if version 13 is significantly different, or affects the information in the guide.

Iridient Developer Guide – No longer being updated (for now)

My Iridient Developer guide is no longer being updated. The reason for this is that there has been a significant falloff in interest in this over the past year and also there has been a significant amount of time since the software has been updated. If there is a major 4.0 release of the software, I may reconsider, and do a new version, but if so it will be a second edition and not a free update. I will continue to make the eBook available, and I’ve reduced the price to €3 for the rest of the year at least, and then see what happens in 2020.

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My X-Transformer Guide Updated

I’ve released a minor update to my X-Transformer guide that addresses some of the recent changes in the application. This is a free update to anyone who had previously bought the guide.

The update is relatively minor, and includes a small addition, as well as changing and deleting sections that are no longer relevant. The changes included in this update are as follows:

  • Version number of the guide changed to 1.6 (to correspond to software version number)
  • Added section on the new compression options introduced in v.1.5.
  • Mentioned changes to the default colour profile in v1.6
  • Updated some screenshots
  • Added section on installing presets, and updated it for latest versions of Lightroom.
  • Deleted references to controls no longer in the software
  • Tidied up language in various places.

The bonus presets that come with the guide have not been updated, so if you are downloading the new version, you don’t need to re-download the presets. I have changed the structure of the preset download to make them easier to install on newer versions of Lightroom, but the presets themselves haven’t changed.

To download the update, you need to go to your account on the store, log in, and then go to the “My Orders” section and then the “Downloads” tab. I have complete instructions on the help centre which shows you how to download updates, including a video if you’re having trouble.

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My New Capture One Fuji Guide is now available

Fuji Capture One guide Hero Image

I’m happy to announce that I’ve finally finished my new Capture One guide for Fuji shooters. Called “Processing RAW files in Capture One 12” – snappy title, I know! – It is written to provide Fuji shooters with enough knowledge to get the best results when working with Fuji RAW files in Capture One. It’s not a complete manual for Capture One, and while you don’t need to be an advanced user, you need to know the basics.

This isn’t an updated version of my old Capture One guide either – it’s a completely new book. The old one was originally written for version 8 and then updated multiple times, but as there have been so many changes lately, I wanted a fresh start with v12 of Capture One, so I started from scratch. There are a few paragraphs from the old one (why re-invent the wheel) and a couple of sections adapted from blog posts, but it’s mostly new material.

The guide is broken down into four chapters. The first chapter introduces the guide, and explains what it is and also the advantages of Capture One for Fuji Shooters.

The second chapter looks at quick set-up tips to make working with Capture One a little easier. It also also looks at some common tasks that you should know for use in Capture One that will also help you use the tips and workflows discussed later in this eBook.

Chapter 3 looks at the various settings and workflows for Capture One that are specific to working with Fuji files, such as how to set film simulations, how to match DR settings and so on.

Chapter 4 looks at the importance of sharpening when processing RAW files, and explains the stages of sharpening. It also covers how Capture One’s sharpening and noise reduction tools work as well offering suggestions on how best to set these parameters when working with Fuji files.

There are also some included presets for sharpening and noise reduction.

There are full details available including a complete breakdown of what’s in each chapter, and a sample of the first chapter to download here on the store page. The guide’s normal price will be €5 but for the next two weeks it will be on sale for just €4.50. (Prices may vary depending on local VAT rates)

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Summer Sale Now On

Sale Now On

To celebrate summer, I’m having a flash sale on selected Lightroom presets and Capture One styles from my digital download store. There’s up to 50% off on some presets, and I’m heavily discounting my older 1st Lightroom preset collection, so you can get it for just €25 (regular price €65). You can see all of the products on sale here on the “on sale” section.

Please note that prices vary slightly depending on your location and the local VAT rate.

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My Fuji Jpeg Guide Updated

Cover of Fuji Jpeg - Shooting and Processing Guide

I’ve just released an updated version of my Fuji Jpeg book. This is a relatively minor update, and is focussed on fixing the language in some places, as well as updating the references mentioned in it to reflect things that have changed since the guide was first written, such as the arrival of newer Fuji cameras, changes to Lightroom etc. the new version number is 1.2, and you can find a complete list of changes below.

This updated version is free to any customer who had bought the previous version of this guide, or the X-Trans Lightroom Bundle which also contained this guide. You can find it in the downloads section under “my account” on the store. If you need help, I have a support document here explaining how to get updates.

One of the biggest changes in this release is based on feedback from a few readers. In the original version of this I had used my X-Pro 2 as an example of how I shoot. While I had tried to make sure that it was clear that this was just an example, some readers felt that it was too much like an “X-Pro2 Guide” rather than a generic Jpeg guide. In order to avoid such confusion in the future, I have significantly reduced the number of references to any specific camera and changed the language to make it more generic.

Also, a big thanks to my Patreon supporters who helped me decide which cover to use.

Changes in Version 1.2

  • Added Reference to Eterna
  • Updated One of the Recipes to use Eterna as an alternative
  • Clarified some of the language around grain in Acros based on feedback
  • Reduced specific mentions of the X-Pro 2 to avoid confusion based on reader feedback.
  • Cleaned up text and changed some of the language used throughout
  • Removed reference to VSCO presets (as they are discontinued) and changed it to more generic language
  • Updated references to version of Lightroom based on their newer titles
  • Updated installation instructions for Lightroom Presets
  • Updated support links
  • Removed outdated links
  • Added a link to my YouTube video explaining shadow and Highlight tone options
  • Removed reference to X-Raw studio being Mac Only
  • New Cover – Chosen by Patreon Supporters

Important information for those updating:

If you don’t see the updated version in your account please make sure you had bought the previous version before contacting support. This is only free to those who had bought the previous edition of this book.

As I have several Fuji guides, there can be some confusion when I issue updates, as people may not be aware as to which guide they had previously bought. This guide is entitled “Fuji Jpegs: Shooting and Processing Guide”. If you don’t see it in your previous orders, then you may have bought a different book instead. If you have bought the Fuji X-Trans Lightroom Bundle, you will also get this updated guide.

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My Fuji Lightroom Guide Updated

I have just released a minor upgrade to my Fuji Lightroom Guide. The book entitled “Workflow and Settings For Processing Fuji X-Trans images in Lightroom” has been updated to take into account some of the more recent changes to Lightroom, including some of the different terminology and so on. It also adds mention of newer 26mp X-Trans cameras. The version number for this is now 1.8. This will probably be the last free upgrade for this guide, as I am now working on a second edition. Here is a list of the specific changes:

  1. Updated information on the release version.
  2. New Cover!
  3. Added note about the addition of “Enhance Details”.
  4. Added details on how to set the colour profile in Lightroom 7.4 or later.
  5. Added details on how to save settings as defaults.
  6. Changed some terminology regarding sharpening guidelines.
  7. Specific mention of 26mp X-Trans cameras.
  8. Added section on Enhanced Details.
  9. Updated information on how to install presets for the newer version of Lightroom.

Please note that the accompanying presets download has been reorganised to make it easier to install on different versions of Lightroom, but there are no new presets. If you have already installed these, you don’t need to re-install them.

This is a free update for anyone who has already purchased the guide. You can download the updated version from your account. See this help centre article for detailed instructions on how to download updates. 

If you are updating, Please make sure to follow the instructions carefully.

As this is my most popular guide, I expect a high level of support requests relating to the update, so if you need to contact support, please expect a delay in getting a response. The most common problems are all covered on my extensive help centre. You can also ask questions or discuss the guide on the Forums in the help centre. This is the best place to ask questions not relating to the download or install of the eBook and presets.

If you haven’t previously purchased this guide and are interested in checking it out, I have put it on sale until the end of the month. You can find out more details here in the store.

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Store News & Updates for 2019

Greetings and welcome to the first update for 2019 of what’s going on on my store! I have a few new and updated products in the works that I wanted to tell you about, and also to give you an opportunity to give me feedback should you wish to.

eBook Updates

I will be updating some of my eBooks over the next little while. I have also taken my Capture One guide out of circulation for the moment, as I am writing a new version. So here’s what’s currently planned:

Capture One Fuji Guide

The original version of this was quite old and with the release of version 12 of Capture One, it was getting too out of date to update. With that in mind, I am working on a completely new guide, specifically for version 12. It will be a complete re-write. It may take a little while, but I hope to have it out in the first half of 2019.

Fuji Lightroom Guide

I will be putting out a minor update to this in the near future. The changes will be relatively minor, and will focus on updating terminology for newer versions of Lightroom. It will also add mentions of newer Fuji cameras such as the X-T3. While the advice and settings for the X-T3 are pretty much the same as older versions, this is causing confusion to some readers, so I will be adding specifics to address that confusion.

This will be a free update, but it will be the final update to this version of the guide. Any future version will be a “second edition” and will be a new book effectively. This is free update is currently scheduled for sometime in February 2019 but this is only an estimated date. It may be delayed.

X-Transformer Guide

There hasn’t been any significant change to the software that warrants re-writing or updating the guide at the moment. I will be examining it to see if there is anything that needs to change in the future, but for now, this will remain at the current version.

Lightroom Presets

I will be tidying up the numerous presets available on my store. I am considering bundling all of the older presets into a single bundle, and the older individual packs will be discontinued. This will apply to the oldest presets that were originally designed for version 4 through 6. I understand that some people are still using this version of the software, but it is not possible to continue to provide support for this, as there is no way to create older presets from the newer versions of Lightroom.

As I am only a small independent photographer, I don’t have the resources to maintain multiple versions of Lightroom. If you had previously downloaded some of these stand alone packs, they will still be available from your account, but they will no longer be available for sale outside of the bundle. I don’t have a set date for this yet, but it will be sometime in the first half of next year.

Capture One Training on YouTube

I have been doing a number of screencasts and tutorials for Capture One on YouTube lately, and these cover the express version as well as preliminary videos on Capture One 12. I am updating these regularly, so check them out if you’re looking for more Capture One information.

What do you want to see?

If there is anything that you want to see, or content that you feel like would make some good training please let me know. Leave a comment on this blog post or comment in the support forums here.

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Capture One Guide Discontinued: New version Coming Soon

With the release of Capture One 12 at the end of November, there have been significant changes to the software, especially for Fuji X-Trans users. With that in mind, I have decided to discontinue selling my old Capture One X-Trans guide. I am however starting work on a new book, which I hope to have out in the next two to three months.

Why not just keep selling the old version?

The original guide was getting quite old. It was originally written for version 8 of Capture One, and then amended with each additional version. It had become something of a hodge-podge of edits and advice built on top of old advice, and it was getting quite confusing. With the release of Version 12 of the software, which has entirely new interface, and adds Fuji film simulation modes, having the old version still available, in my opinion, could confuse new readers. I had put a notice up on the guide that it was being discontinued and reduced the price for the month of December, but now that it’s January, I felt that it’s time to end the sale of it.

Will the new version be free to customers of the old version?

No. I sell these guides very inexpensively, and to cover the cost of writing an entirely new book, I need to charge for it. The old guide was on sale for several years, and the average price has been just €3. The new book will be a completely different guide and re-written from scratch.

When will it be available?

I hope to have the new version available in the first quarter of 2019. I hope to have it even sooner than this, but I don’t want to set unrealistic targets. If you follow my blog, or sign up for the newsletter, you will be notified of new releases.

Where can I learn about the new software in the meantime?

I will continue to cover Capture One on my blog. I will also be providing a work in progress update to the new guide on Patreon for Patreon supporters. Patreon supporters will also get the new guide for free. I also cover Capture One on my YouTube channel.

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An important Note About Preset Visibility in Lightroom 8.1

For the past few versions of Lightroom, Adobe has continued to refine the way Presets work in the develop module. In 8.1, there is yet another change, which may affect the way some of my Presets show up or work in Lightroom. Don’t worry though, most presets still work fine. 

Let me explain…

What’s the issue?

In version 8.1 Adobe added an option to highlight presets they list as “Partially Compatible”. If a preset is showing up in the preset panel in italics and greyed out, it’s because the software considers it only partially compatible with the image. There can be a few different reasons for Presets to be labelled as partially compatible, but the main one is due to the colour profile used when the preset was created. 

As you probably know, Adobe has supplied colour profiles to match the camera picture modes for most cameras, since the earliest versions of Lightroom. However, some cameras have different modes, and picture profiles might be labelled differently. For example, the “standard” picture profile on a Canon camera is called “Standard” but on a Fuji camera, there is no profile labelled “standard” and the equivalent mode is “Provia”. Furthermore, a Jpeg file will have no picture modes at all and just uses the embedded colour profile. Because the colour profile can be included as part of a preset, if you apply one of those presets to an image that doesn’t have a corresponding colour profile, Lightroom now flags this as “partially compatible”.

In older versions of Lightroom, if the preset was applied to an image without a corresponding profile, Lightroom would just ignore it and apply the Adobe Standard” profile. However, now they have chosen to label these presets is only partially compatible. While this is useful for letting users know that there may be some incompatibilities, it is perhaps a bit confusing, as it leads users to think that there is something wrong with the presets, when there isn’t.

How it affects my presets

Some of my presets have a Picture Profile included in the preset information. In the past, this was ok because even if the image didn’t have a corresponding colour profile available, it would revert to the default, and there was no need for the user to be aware because it wasn’t an issue. Now, however, they are flagged, and this may become a source of confusion for users.

So what do you need to do?

You don’t need to do anything. The presets still work fine, and still revert to using the standard profile, as intended. You will just see them in italics in the preset browser. 

I’m not seeing the presets at all?

If you’re not seeing the presets at all, it’s because of the option to show partially compatible presets has been unchecked. To fix this, go to the preferences window, and go to the presets tab, and make sure the following option is ticked:

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How to use presets on Lightroom Mobile

Adobe recently introduced a new feature for the mobile version of Lightroom CC that people had been requesting for a long time, and that is the ability to use presets. What’s more, they also added preset syncing between the desktop and mobile versions of Lightroom CC. You can now use all of your Lightroom presets, and profiles on your mobile device and the process is fairly simple. You will, however, need to use Lightroom CC on the desktop. You will also need a creative cloud subscription.

If you’re not currently using the desktop version of Lightroom CC (not to be confused with Lightroom Classic) you will need to install it. Even if you don’t intend to use it, you still need to have it installed in order to sync presets to the mobile version. Once you have it installed and setup you’re ready to go. 

Installing presets in Lightroom CC

The first step is to install your presets into Lightroom CC. This requires a different process than Lightroom Classic, but it’s actually a little easier. Here’s what to do:

  1. Open Lightroom CC
  2. Go to the Edit Mode (Press E on your keyboard)
  3. Click on the Presets button at the bottom of the interface.
  4. At the top of the presets panel that appears click on the … menu button, and from the menu choose import presets.
  5. From the open and save dialogue, select the folder of presets that you want to import, and click on “Import”
  6. This will import your presets into Lightroom CC on the desktop. they will now sync over the cloud to your other versions (providing you have an internet connection, obviously)

Applying presets in Lightroom Mobile

Once you have the presets installed, you can now use them on the mobile version of Lightroom, providing you have the latest version and an active subscription. The process is pretty simple but here’s what to do:

  1. On your iPhone, iPad or Android device open Lightroom
  2. Select an image to work on by tapping on it.
  3. Tap on the presets button. This is the second button down on the interface and it looks like two circles intersecting.
  4. if you don’t see your presets immediately, it may take a few moments for them to sync
  5. Simply tap on the preset to preview it.
  6. Tap on the Done button at the bottom of the interface to apply the preset.

Applying a preset to multiple images (a workaround)

Unfortunately there currently is no way to apply a preset to multiple images as there is in Lightroom Classic. There’s also no “apply on import” option or the ability to set defaults. If you want to apply a preset to multiple images you will need to apply it to one and then copy and paste it to others. Alternatively, you can use the previous button. 

To Copy and paste settings, here’s what to do.

  1. Select an image and apply your preset as per the instructions above.
  2. Tap on the … menu at the top of the screen
  3. Select “Copy Settings from the menu”
  4. Select the options that you want to copy. 
  5. Move to another image
  6. Tap on the … menu again
  7. Choose paste settings

To use the “Previous” button. Note the Previous button is the last button on the top right set of controls.

  1. Select an image and apply a preset
  2. Move to another image.
  3. You may need to wait a moment before the previous button becomes available. Once it is no longer greyed out.
  4. Tap on the previous button
  5. Select “Adjustments” to apply just the things that were changed, or All to apply every setting.

That’s all there is to it. I recommend the copy and paste option as this stores the settings in the clipboard, and it doesn’t matter if you make changes to an image, or if you interrupt the process of switching to a new image and applying previous settings.

Don’t forget to check out the latest presets for Lightroom that I have available here on the store!