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New Creative Profiles Pack for Lightroom and Photoshop

I’m happy to announce that my newest product is now available. It is a set of creative profiles for use with Lightroom (version 7.3 or later) and Photoshop Camera RAW. “Creative Profile Pack One” is a set of 45 creative profiles for Lightroom and Photoshop.

Creative Profiles were introduced in Lightroom 7.3 and are a one-click way to apply a look to your image. Unlike a preset which adjusts the sliders in Lightroom, Creative Profiles behave more like an overall effect, and with a single button, apply all the adjustments. They have the additional advantage of allowing you to adjust the amount of the effect with a single slider. Creative profiles can also equally be applied to both Jpeg and RAW files.

The profiles in this pack are decided into three collections: Film Lux Profiles, TF-Colour and TF-Mono. Some of these are derived from my popular Lightroom presets but have been specially modified and enhanced so that they work better as Profiles.

CP1-Box.jpgFilm Lux Profiles are loosely based on my “Film Lux” presets, and provide an analogue film feel. TF-Colour contains a number of colour effects, including Vivid effects, and Warming and Cooling effects. They contain some looks inspired by my popular Landscape Gold and Bleached Bronze presets. TF-Mono contains a number of black and white profiles.

Creative Pack One is on sale now for €15 but for the rest of the month, it’s on sale for just €12 (until the 31st July). There are full details and some downloadable sample profiles for you to try on the product page.

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Introducing Alpine for Capture One

A few weeks ago when I launched Alpine for Lightroom, a few people wrote to me asking for a Capture One version. After some work and experimentation, I’m happy to announce that I now have a version of Alpine for Capture One. It’s not exactly the same as the Lightroom version due to the differences in how the software works, but it’s broadly similar. 

So what is Alpine? In a nutshell, Alpine for Capture One is a set of “Styles” that is designed to give your RAW images a stylised look. The idea for Alpine was to work with images of forests and mountains, to give the “woodsman” style of effect that is popular certain outdoor magazines. The styles generally work by enhancing the greens and browns in an image and are best suited to photos which contain a lot of these tones. Alpine is also designed to work best with lower contrast images, typically shot on misty or overcast days, although there are also some styles that will be better on sunnier, high contrast images too.

Porting these from Lightroom to Capture One was initially a little more difficult than I was expecting. The reason for this is that some adjustments, while they might have the same names, and broadly do the same thing, actually behave quite differently in different software. The other problem I have is that the starting point for different cameras in Capture One is much more variable than it is in Lightroom.

After a considerable amount of trial and error and tweaking various settings I managed to come up with a set that I was happy with, and captures the essence of the original idea behind Alpine. The Capture One version actually includes a few additional looks that weren’t in the originalLightroom version too, and overall, I think it’s a good package. While it is designed for a fairly narrow set of subjects, the styles should give you a pretty good starting point. 

Alpine for Capture One is available now. the regular price is €10 but for the first two weeks, it will be on sale for just €8 (until July 8th). To learn more about Alpine for Capture One, and to see some samples of the product in action, check out the product pages. This is my second set of Capture One presets, with the first being “Silver Lux”. 

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Alpine for Lightroom & Photoshop now Available

I’m pleased to announce that my latest set of Lightroom presets are now finally available. I had previewed these a while ago, with the intention of releasing them shortly thereafter, but then Adobe went and changed the preset format, so I had to delay the launch until I made sure everything was working ok. The advantage of the delay is that the set is now compatible with both Photoshop and Lightroom, and I’ve also included 5 creative profiles too. So without further ado, introducing Alpine for Lightroom and Photoshop.

The idea behind Alpine was to create a set of presets for creatively colouring images of forests and mountains. I wanted to go for the “Woodsman” style look, which is popular in some outdoors magazines. that was the start of the process, and it kind of took on a life of its own from there. There are 19 presets in total, although some are “light” and “dark” variations of the same style.

There are also 5 creative profiles for use with the new profile browser. Interestingly, I’ve achieved some quite interesting looks by combining the presets and the profiles, so that’s something to check out also. You can find out more and see some examples over on the product page, and I’ve also embedded the video demo I had made previously there too.

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An Update on Lightroom Presets in Version 7.3 and Later

Ever since Adobe updated Lightroom earlier this month and changed the way presets are stored, there has been a lot of confusion around the new system, and I myself have been caught out by this too. In fact, I was so confused by the changes, I mistook one aspect of the new format entirely, and ended up putting out some incorrect information. Luckily a reader set me straight, and so here is the semi-definitive guide to the new preset format.

First of all, if you have upgraded to 7.3, you may want to get the latest point update (released yesterday at the time of writing this) as it fixes some of the bugs that were introduced with 7.3. These were mostly to do with the sorting of presets, but there were a few other bugs too, and this point update is supposed to address those.

Note, if you have any of my presets, and they were installed before you upgraded, then you don’t need to do anything. This information is primarily intended for those who may need to re-install presets at a later date, or are installing them after upgrading to Lightroom 7.3

The new format

In a nutshell, Adobe changed the format that Lightroom presets used from the old .lrtemplate format, which used their own data structure (I think) to a standard .xmp file format. This new format is also shared with Photoshop and Camera Raw, and in fact presets are now shared between the two.

New .xmp presets go into a different location than the old presets, and this new “settings” folder is the same location as you use to store presets for Camera Raw now too. As I said, presets are now shared between Lightroom Classic and Photoshop. The new format also supports some additional things that the old format didn’t. You can now add copyright information for example. The new “creative profiles” that were also announced as part of Lightroom 7.3, also use the same .xmp format and the files go in the same place. In fact, they are a variation of the new preset format. The new files can also have sorting information built into the preset, rather than be based on the folder structure where they’re stored, which I suspect may have been part of the problems with upgrading.

Upgrading & compatibility

It is the process of upgrading older presets that tripped me up at first. I had read from a reliable source that Lightroom only upgraded legacy presets once, at the time of upgrading to 7.3. However, it turns out that this is not the case at all. If you install new legacy .lrtemplate presets, Lightroom will detect the new presets and upgrade these the next time you launch Lightroom. This means that older presets remain compatible, at least for now.

Screenshot 2018-04-25 12.51.38.jpg

So, if you want to install legacy .lrtemplate presets, you can do so, just as you used to. You install them into the original preset destination, and then when you relaunch Lightroom, it will run through the upgrade process again.

I had kind of panicked when this release came out as I thought all my presets would be incompatible, but it turns out I was worrying over nothing. They should all still work as before, with the only difference being the upgrading step which happens automatically.

Mixing new and old presets

If you are installing both new and old presets, then you need to make sure that you put them into the right location. So here is a handy diagram to help you make sure you put the right ones in the right place.

The root folder location for this diagram (below) is different on windows and macOS. The simplest way to get to this is to open Lightroom, then go to preferences -> presets and click on the show presets button. This will open the Lightroom folder. You need to go up one level in the hierarchy to get to the root Adobe folder. Or you can go to the location directly in either the finder or windows explorer.

Mac: ~/Library/Application Support/Adobe/ PC: C:\ProgramData\Adobe\

To go to a specific folder on a Mac, from the Finder menu choose Go > Go To Folder…

lr presets.jpg
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Major changes to Lightroom in 7.3 – Some important Notes about my Products

Adobe has just released a major new version of Lightroom that includes some significant changes. The biggest and most notable one is the inclusion of new Raw and “Creative” profiles. However, there are also some major changes under the hood. Specifically, they have changed the file format that presets use. If you have any of my guides or presets, you may be wondering what happens.

If you are upgrading and already have presets installed, Lightroom will upgrade the presets for you when you first launch Lightroom 7.3. However, this only happens once. So if you have my presets installed before the upgrade, they should be upgraded without any problems.

However if you try to install my presets after the upgrade using the old instructions, nothing will happen, and they won’t appear. This is because they will need to be upgraded, or newer versions will need to be installed.

I will endeavour to release upgraded versions as soon as physically possible. In the meantime here is, however, a temporary workaround. If you choose to import presets from the + menu at top of the presets panel in Lightroom Classic and select the presets, they will be upgraded as you import. This may take a few minutes. The downside to this is that you can’t select a folder, and they will go to your User Presets folder inside the develop module.

I have been blindsided by this, as Adobe only told a select few developers in advance of today’s release. I’m sure this will cause confusion, so I apologise to anyone who is having difficulty. I will endeavour to upgrade everything as soon as possible, but as I have a lot, I need to take the time to make sure it gets done properly.

I’ll have another post on my main blog shortly about some of the other changes in Lightroom, and what it means, so stay tuned.

See this help centre article for a step by step guide for installing older presets.

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Presets in Action: Snow Images with Industrial Iron

I had originally created my Industrial Iron set of Lightroom presets primarily to be used on the urban decay genre of photograph. I had gone for certain tones that I felt would enhance the industrial and mechanical look, while giving a kind of harsh and bleak tonality to images. But the presets work well in other circumstances too.

We recently had some heavy snow where I live, and I went out to take some photographs in my area while I could. When processing the images, I was trying to give them a stylised look, and quite by accident, I tried some of the presets from the Industrial Iron pack on the images. They actually worked really well, and I ended up using them as a basis for the look on the whole set of photos.

Below is a selection of images from the shoot. You can see the full photo essay here on my Photo Journal. Industrial Iron is available now from here on the store.

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My new Fuji Jpeg Guide is now Available

I’m happy to announce that my latest in a series of guides for Fuji X-Series cameras is now available. The official title is “Fuji Jpegs: A Guide to Shooting and Processing” is a 76-page guide with tips and techniques for getting the best results when shooting with Fuji’s Jpeg engine.

The guide covers both things you can do in-camera and how to treat your images afterwards. I start by discussing why you would want to shoot JPEG in the first place. I outline some of the advantages and disadvantages of shooting the format, and I talk about the pros and cons of shooting Jpeg and RAW to separate cards on cameras with dual card slots.

I then talk about some of the settings that you can change in-camera on Fuji X-series cameras, how things like shadow tone and highlight tone work. I also discuss noise reduction and sharpening settings, and how to optimise the in-camera jpegs for post-production.

This is followed by some more general shooting tips, including how I have my own X-Pro 2 set up, and some tips for avoiding camera shake, how to focus on tricky subjects and so on. I also offer a series of recipes. These are basically some suggestions for combinations of settings that you can use to achieve various effects in-camera.

Finally, I look at some tips for processing Jpegs. I look at ways to sharpen Jpegs based on the settings I had previously suggested, and I look at some other tips and tricks for different software. Specifically, I deal with Lightroom, Photoshop and Apple Photos. I also discuss Fuji’s own X-Raw studio and how to generate new Jpegs from raw files in-camera. The guide also comes with some presets for Lightroom, designed to sharpen Jpegs and some Actions for Photoshop.

It’s the longest in this series of guides that I’ve written yet, and I hope people find it useful. I tried to pitch this guide at a broad audience in terms of experience level. I didn’t want to make it too “beginner” to put off more experienced readers, but I didn’t want to make it too advanced either. Similarly, it covers a broad range of topics, but I didn’t want to go too deep into any one, as not everyone has the same interests. It’s probably a little different from my other guides too, in that it focuses more on shooting rather than editing.

Anyway, I have been quite nervous about launching it, because it is a little different, but it’s done now, so it’s in the hands of the readers!

The guide will normally sell for €6.50 but I’m having a special launch price of €5 for the first two weeks. (The exact price depends on local Vat rates.) You can find out more details about it here on the store page, including a complete chapter breakdown, and a downloadable excerpt.

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Introducing Film Candy LUTS

I’m happy to introduce my first new digital product of 2018, and something that I’ve been working on for quite some time. Today I’m launching a new set of LUTs based on my “Film Candy” series of Lightroom presets. This set of 75 LUTs contains looks from both Film candy 1 and 2 and have been designed to be used in popular video applications as well as stills software such as Luminar 2018 and Photoshop.

To give you an idea of how these work in real life, I put together a little video showing the LUTs in action. This was created in FCPX 10.4 using he new built in LUT tool.

The History of Film Candy

Film Candy was the first digital product that I ever created, and it was originally developed for Apple’s Aperture. There were three releases of the original Aperture presets, and these were small packs containing a few presets each. When I switched entirely to Lightroom, I created Film Candy for Lightroom, which combines ideas from all three of the original Aperture versions, and creates similar looks for Lightroom.

These LUT versions of film candy are based on the Lightroom Presets of the same name, and are a collection of looks derived from both Film Candy 1 and Film Candy 2 for Lightroom.

Creating these was actually a little harder that I had anticipated. There are many tools available to convert Lightroom presets into LUTs but it turns out it’s not that straightforward. You need to use specific source images to make sure all colours are covered, and even then if you get some things wrong, you can make unusable LUTs. It took a lot of trial and error to get these right.

The LUTs are available now on my store for €25. Its a pretty big pack with 75 LUTs and it’s approximately a 150mb download. For the launch it will be on sale for €20 for the first two weeks.

(Price includes VAT based on the Irish vat rate, but will vary depending on your location. The store will show you the current price based on your local Vat rate. Outside the EU price will be shown exclusive of VAT)

To try out these LUTs and to make sure that the format works for you, I have created a sample pack with 5 LUTS from the overall pack for you to try. You can use this to make sure you can use these before you buy. The sample pack is available to download from the product page on the store.

Stay tuned to my YouTube channel too, I’ll have some more tutorials on how to use these in applications such as Final Cut Pro and Luminar soon.

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Winter Lightroom Preset Bundle Sale: 50% off

For the month of November and December, I’m having a sale on my Lightroom Preset Bundles. These include the Monochrome Collection, and the three other Lightroom Preset bundles that I do. For the next two months, these will be available from the store for half price.

The bundles on sale are:

Please note that prices above include VAT at the Irish rate, and may change depending on the local VAT rate where you are.

You can see all of the products that I currently have on sale on this special “On Sale” page.

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Compatibility of my Lightroom Products with Lightroom Classic and Lightroom CC

Major new versions of Lightroom were recently released, and the Lightroom family now consists of two Applications: Lightroom CC and Lightroom Classic. Lightroom classic is the new name for the previous version of Lightroom, and Lightroom CC is a new desktop version of the mobile and cloud version of Lightroom. As many of my products contain Lightroom presets, including the actual Lightroom preset packs that I sell, I wanted to outline the current state of compatibility with the new versions of Lightroom, and give an outline of future plans.

Lightroom Presets and Compatibility with Lightroom Classic

All of my presets of are compatible with Lightroom Classic with one minor issue. This includes any presets included with any of my guides.

The one issue is that the presets currently set the process version. This was done to ensure that they wouldn’t use an older version which wouldn’t have the necessary features, and was the recommended way of saving presets. However now that there is a new process version (Version 4) and applying any of my presets at current will set the image to the older (Version 3). It should be noted that the changes in version 4, according to Adobe are to do with performance issues, and so the change will not affect your images visually.

If you’re using my presets, and they set the process version to 3, and you want to change it back to the current process version after applying there are three ways to do this:

  1. Manually change it in the calibration panel of the Develop module
  2. If you have the older process version applied, you will see a little lightening bolt icon on the histogram panel in the develop module. Clicking on this will bring up a dialog box asking you if you want to upgrade. This will also ask you if you want to upgrade all the images on the filmstrip.
  3. You can batch upgrade lots of Images by going to the library module, selecting the images and choosing Photo > Develop Settings > Update to current process

I will be rolling out updates to the existing presets over the coming weeks that remove the explicit setting of the process version. I will be updating the presets that come with my guides first, and then stand alone presets. However, I also plan to discontinue some of my older presets, so some of the very old ones won’t be updated, unless there is significant demand. They will all still work, but just you will just need to manually upgrade the process version.

Lightroom Presets and compatibility with Lightroom CC

Lightroom CC can use presets too, however there are a few key features missing from Lightroom CC which means that I can’t guarantee compatibility at this stage. Specifically, Lightroom CC does not include the ability to change the colour profile, but you can change it by using presets.

It is also lacking some of the grain controls. However, in general look presets should work, and sharpening presets should work too.

To install presets into Lightroom CC do the following

  1. Launch Lightroom CC
  2. Select any Image and go to the develop mode
  3. Click on the presets button
  4. From the … menu at the top of the presets panel, choose: “Open Presets Folder”
  5. This should open the folder, either in the Finder on the Mac, or Windows Explorer on Windows.
  6. Copy your presets in here.
  7. Restart Lightroom CC

Roadmap

I am planning to upgrade the presets that come with my guides as a priority. This may take a little time, as I need to do multiple checks to make sure everything works and so on.

The Fuji sharpening presets will also be updated, as will f-Variations, however, as these are free they will be last to be updated

For my standalone Lightroom preset packs, I will endeavour to update these as soon as possible, however I am discontinuing older preset packs in the next little while.

[UPDATE] I’ve now updated all the presets to remove explicit references to the process version, so if you want to update, you can re-download them from your account. See here for more details.

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Autumn Lightroom Preset Sale: 50% off selected Preset Pack

To celebrate the arrival of Autumn, I’m putting a selection of my Lightroom Presets down to half price. This includes “Landscape Gold”, which started life as a way to enhance Autumn images, and is great for enhancing the warm tones in your pictures.

Also reduced to half price are Film Candy 1 and 2 which are special effects presets, designed to create a vintage, or expired film look. Previously €15 they are now just €7. Finally, Vivid Extreme and QuickLux one are now just €5 each, also down to half price (or even less in the case of QuickLux.)

This sale will run throughout September. You can see all the products currently on sale here.

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Presets in Action: Enhancing the mood, Creating Filmic Black & White with T-Pan for Lightroom

Howth in Black and White with T-Pan for Lightroom

A little while ago I got up early in the morning and headed to a little fishing town just north of Dublin to get some morning shots of the sleepy port coming to life. I had originally hoped that it would be a nice bright morning, and that I would capture the early rays of the sun over the sea and the harbour, but instead a thick cloud was down, and it was beginning to rain.

I wasn’t disappointed though, I was actually happy, because the result was a really moody light. I got a great sequence of shots of the port waking up, and fishermen leaving to go about their day’s work.

When I got back to the studio and started processing the photos, I actually tried a couple of themes. With the moody light, and rich blue of the morning, I started by using some looks from my QickLux2 set. I created a whole sequence using these looks, but while experimenting, I also wanted to try some black and whites. When I started going through my presets, I realised that I was getting a really filmic look with T-Pan, and so I ended up creating a set with that too.

I originally created T-Pan to be as close to film as possible, but sometimes it works better than others. It depends a lot on the source material, and in this case I think it works out really well. For some of the shots, it actually makes them look almost like they were taken years ago.

Tip: One of the tricks to make something look more film-like when using film presets in Lightroom is to turn the sharpening off. Some presets have this baked in, but I kept the sharpening untouched with T-Pan. So, if you want to add a little of the film like softness, turn your sharpening off. The grain will add a sense of sharpness anyway.

Below is the sequence I created, as well as a couple of before and after shots:

T-Pan is available now from here on the store, both stand alone and as part of my black and white presets bundle.

Monochrome Lightroom Preset Bundle BoxT-Pan for Lightroom - Lightroom Presets - Virtual Box