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How to use presets on Lightroom Mobile

Adobe recently introduced a new feature for the mobile version of Lightroom CC that people had been requesting for a long time, and that is the ability to use presets. What’s more, they also added preset syncing between the desktop and mobile versions of Lightroom CC. You can now use all of your Lightroom presets, and profiles on your mobile device and the process is fairly simple. You will, however, need to use Lightroom CC on the desktop. You will also need a creative cloud subscription.

If you’re not currently using the desktop version of Lightroom CC (not to be confused with Lightroom Classic) you will need to install it. Even if you don’t intend to use it, you still need to have it installed in order to sync presets to the mobile version. Once you have it installed and setup you’re ready to go. 

Installing presets in Lightroom CC

The first step is to install your presets into Lightroom CC. This requires a different process than Lightroom Classic, but it’s actually a little easier. Here’s what to do:

  1. Open Lightroom CC
  2. Go to the Edit Mode (Press E on your keyboard)
  3. Click on the Presets button at the bottom of the interface.
  4. At the top of the presets panel that appears click on the … menu button, and from the menu choose import presets.
  5. From the open and save dialogue, select the folder of presets that you want to import, and click on “Import”
  6. This will import your presets into Lightroom CC on the desktop. they will now sync over the cloud to your other versions (providing you have an internet connection, obviously)

Applying presets in Lightroom Mobile

Once you have the presets installed, you can now use them on the mobile version of Lightroom, providing you have the latest version and an active subscription. The process is pretty simple but here’s what to do:

  1. On your iPhone, iPad or Android device open Lightroom
  2. Select an image to work on by tapping on it.
  3. Tap on the presets button. This is the second button down on the interface and it looks like two circles intersecting.
  4. if you don’t see your presets immediately, it may take a few moments for them to sync
  5. Simply tap on the preset to preview it.
  6. Tap on the Done button at the bottom of the interface to apply the preset.

Applying a preset to multiple images (a workaround)

Unfortunately there currently is no way to apply a preset to multiple images as there is in Lightroom Classic. There’s also no “apply on import” option or the ability to set defaults. If you want to apply a preset to multiple images you will need to apply it to one and then copy and paste it to others. Alternatively, you can use the previous button. 

To Copy and paste settings, here’s what to do.

  1. Select an image and apply your preset as per the instructions above.
  2. Tap on the … menu at the top of the screen
  3. Select “Copy Settings from the menu”
  4. Select the options that you want to copy. 
  5. Move to another image
  6. Tap on the … menu again
  7. Choose paste settings

To use the “Previous” button. Note the Previous button is the last button on the top right set of controls.

  1. Select an image and apply a preset
  2. Move to another image.
  3. You may need to wait a moment before the previous button becomes available. Once it is no longer greyed out.
  4. Tap on the previous button
  5. Select “Adjustments” to apply just the things that were changed, or All to apply every setting.

That’s all there is to it. I recommend the copy and paste option as this stores the settings in the clipboard, and it doesn’t matter if you make changes to an image, or if you interrupt the process of switching to a new image and applying previous settings.

Don’t forget to check out the latest presets for Lightroom that I have available here on the store!

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Presets in Action: Enhancing the mood, Creating Filmic Black & White with T-Pan for Lightroom

Howth in Black and White with T-Pan for Lightroom

A little while ago I got up early in the morning and headed to a little fishing town just north of Dublin to get some morning shots of the sleepy port coming to life. I had originally hoped that it would be a nice bright morning, and that I would capture the early rays of the sun over the sea and the harbour, but instead a thick cloud was down, and it was beginning to rain.

I wasn’t disappointed though, I was actually happy, because the result was a really moody light. I got a great sequence of shots of the port waking up, and fishermen leaving to go about their day’s work.

When I got back to the studio and started processing the photos, I actually tried a couple of themes. With the moody light, and rich blue of the morning, I started by using some looks from my QickLux2 set. I created a whole sequence using these looks, but while experimenting, I also wanted to try some black and whites. When I started going through my presets, I realised that I was getting a really filmic look with T-Pan, and so I ended up creating a set with that too.

I originally created T-Pan to be as close to film as possible, but sometimes it works better than others. It depends a lot on the source material, and in this case I think it works out really well. For some of the shots, it actually makes them look almost like they were taken years ago.

Tip: One of the tricks to make something look more film-like when using film presets in Lightroom is to turn the sharpening off. Some presets have this baked in, but I kept the sharpening untouched with T-Pan. So, if you want to add a little of the film like softness, turn your sharpening off. The grain will add a sense of sharpness anyway.

Below is the sequence I created, as well as a couple of before and after shots:

T-Pan is available now from here on the store, both stand alone and as part of my black and white presets bundle.

Monochrome Lightroom Preset Bundle BoxT-Pan for Lightroom - Lightroom Presets - Virtual Box

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Capture One Styles in Action: SilverLux for Street Photography

Street Photo - Black and White With Capture One and SilverLUX

I was recently shooting some Street Photography with my Fuji X-Pro 2 and I was processing the images with Capture One. I was trying various different looks, but in the end I wanted to go with a black and white theme. As I already had a whole set of looks already created, with SilverLUX, I used this as the basis for the overall style of the images.

While there is a whole range of different effects available with Silver Lux, I ended up using a few of the styles the most often. These allowed me to create a consistent theme for the collection. In addition, I also used some of the grain presets that come with the pack in order to add a little stronger grain to the images. Below is a look at the final result, as well as a few before and after examples.

 

Silver LUX for Capture One is available now from right here on the store.

SilverLUX for Capture One is a set of “Styles” that are designed to give your RAW images a black and white effect. There are 25 Styles in total included with SilverLUX. The set also comes with a collection of 20 grain presets that makes use of Capture One’s excellent grain function to give you a range of grain options.

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My Presets for Aurora HDR now available

I’ve been working with the excellent AuroraHDR from MacPhun for some time now, and slowly I’ve been building a collection of presets to use with the software. I’m delighted to say that they’re now available. The pack includes a collection of 22 presets. The included looks are designed to cover a wide variety of styles, and include more traditional, artistic style looks as well as more natural looking styles. The pack also contains some presets designed to work with single image HDR files, and also some black and white HDR looks.

If you already have Aurora HDR, you can get the presets from here on my Digital Download store. If you don’t have the software already, and are interested, MacPhun are giving my readers a great deal, and you can get a bundle of the software and My Presets and get €20 off. The deal is available directly from their website.

The download includes a Pack of presets that can be installed into AuroraHDR. The pack contains 22 individual presets.

You can find out more on my Download Store. The pack is normally priced €10 but will be on sale for the fist two weeks for just €7 (Price may vary depending on your local VAT rate)

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My Presets in Action: Processing Street Photography with QuickLux 2

QuickLux 2 Street Photography Before and After Lightroom Presets

Over on my Photography Blog I regularly publish a series called: “Street Photo Diary”. This, as the name suggest, is a series of blog posts dedicated to Street Photography. I usually have a new entry in this series about once every month, and every so often I will go with a different look, or a different style. For the latest issue of my Street Photo diary series, I used my “QuickLUX 2” set of presets as the base look for the photos.

In particular, I chose the specific preset “Qneg-Basic02” as the starting pint. I really like this look, and it’a probably my favourite and most used from QuickLux 2. It’s hard to describe what it is that appeals to me about it. When I was creating it, I was going for the Woodsman / Outdoors style that was popular in certain lifestyle magazines at the time. Since then I like using it on images when it’s a dull day.

As always, I start the process by culling the shots from the shoot. In this case it was from several different shots. I used Lightroom’s “Set as target collection” function to sent a new collection as the destination, and then I went through the previous set of street shoots, and when I came to an image I wanted for this series, I pressed the D key to add it to the collection.

Once I had the project curated into a collection that I wanted to work on, I set about processing them. I had already decided which look to go with, so I started by applying the preset as the base. In this case, as mentioned earlier it was “QNeg-Basic02”. After applying that, I tweaked the exposure slightly. I also added a little extra grain. Here’s a before and after example:

In some cases I did a little more to the shots. I tweaked the curve slightly. The QNeg-Basic02 preset has a slightly raised black level in the curves, and sometimes this can make the blacks a little too grey, so for situations where it was a bit much, I lowered the black point on the curve. In the majority of cases though, the most I would have to do is just tweak the exposure after applying the presets. Here are a few more before and after example:

You can see the original Street Photo Diary blog post here. For more information about QuickLux2, you can find out full details on the product page. There is also a sample of one of the QuickLux presets in the Lightroom Sample Pack if you want to try it before getting the full set.

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My Presets in Action: Cherry Blossoms & Film Lux

As spring is here once again, the Cherry Blossoms are blooming, and I just love the beauty of these fleeting flowers. On a beautiful sunny day I was in a local park here in Dublin and I was taking some images of the beautiful cherry trees there. I also recorded the shoot and created a video of the session in action which you can find on my YouTube channel.

I shot the photos using a Fuji X-Pro 2 and for post processing, I wanted to go with a nice film look, and so, after trying out a few different presets, I eventually settled on using my own FilmLUX set as my starting point. But first, let me back up a bit. I actually pre-processed the files with the excellent Iridient X-Transformer first, converting them to DNG. When using DNGs created with X-Transformer, the resulting files behave exactly like RAW files, and so can be used with any preset. On import, I used the “Provia” colour profile as my base setting.

After going through the images from the shoot, I picked the ones I wanted to work on, and then I started editing in the develop module in Lightroom. I selected “FL-Film Base Slide 01” from FilmLUX as the starting point. Once I applied that I did some additional tweaking. This was mostly just to adjust the exposure slightly or the highlight and shadow recovery.

As I wanted them all to have the same feel to them, and be part of a series, I went through each image from my selects, and used the “Previous” button in Lightroom to apply the settings from he previous photo, and then did some minot tweaking for each shot. Using this method I was able to quickly process the whole shoot.

Here are some of the photos that I took that day, processed using FilmLUX. You can find out more about FilmLUX here.

 

Film Lux Lightroom Presets

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Introducing T-Pan for Lightroom

T-Pan for Lightroom example

I’m delighted to announce that my first set of new Lightroom Presets for 2017 is now available. It’s called T-Pan and it’s a new set of Black and White Presets. I came up with the style when working on trying to copy the look of some film that a friend had asked me to scan, and I’m pretty happy with the results. T-PAN is an attempt to create a realistic set of monochrome film presets, and it is aiming to re-create the experience of shooting with a professional grade black and white film.

Within the pack there are 10 versions of T-Pan. Each version is it’s now “Film” as such. Unlike some of my previous presets, T-PAN does not require a separate setup preset. The look that has been created uses a camera’s Portrait profile as its starting point, and this has been baked into the presets. There is also a special version of the presets for Fuji X-Trans shooters. This is called T-PAN F. These have the required colour profile already baked into the presets.

Each of the 10 “Film” stocks, in other words each version of the presets, comes with three variations:

T-PAN (Normal) This is the normal Version of the film

T-PAN+ This version s a little brighter, with some shadow recovery, and slightly less grain

T-PAN 400 This is a version of the film styled after ISO400 speed black and white films. It has more contrast and definition than the regular version, but with increased grain.

T-PAN also comes with a set of tools, which consists of a number of faux colour filters for different effects (these don’t colour the image, they’re the equivalent of putting a filter on your lens if shooting with actual film) and a set of additional grain presets, for easy application of different types of grain.

Just a side point of interest. For the Fuji versions, the presets are based on the “Astia” profile. You’re probably wondering why I decided on using Astia rather than one of Fuji’s black and white colour profiles or even Acros? It’s because doing so would not allow the use of faux colour filters which is based on adjusting the black and white mix.

The presets are available now on my Digital Download store. They will normally sell for €8 (price may vary depending on local Taxes) but they’ll be on sale for the launch at just €5

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Preset Tips: Changing the Colour Profile for a different Effect

Preset Tips: Changing the Colour Profile for a different Effect

If you’re a user of any of my presets, then you will know that I’ve designed them with the idea of being used with the “Standard” camera profile. The idea behind this was to provide a base level of compatibility across cameras, without having to create custom colour profiles for different models. Most manufacturers have a standard profile, and while obviously this isn’t exactly the same across different cameras, it’s generally the most “normal” looking profile, which is why I use that as the base for my presets.

Having said that, there’s nothing to stop you from changing the profile for effect. Using the standard profile will give you a similar look to what I had in mind when I created the presets, but changing the profile won’t break them, and if you’re looking for some creative alternatives, then using a different profile might be beneficial.

On many DSLRs there are portrait, neutral, vivid and landscape profiles in addition to the standard ones. These may be called different things depending on the camera and the make, but most cameras contain some variation of these picture modes, and Lightroom generally has corresponding profiles.

Using a Neutral or Portrait profile will generally lower the contrast, and reduce the saturation a little bit. Using this profile can be useful if you find that some of the presets are too contrasty, but you otherwise like the overall look. On the other hand, using a Vivid or Landscape profile can have the opposite effect and actually increase the contrast. This can be useful if you want to add even more punch to an image. It can also be an interesting thing to try if you’re using presets on images of greenery, foliage and so on, as the Vivid profiles generally bring out the greens more in an image.

If you’re using a Fuji camera, your choices are a bit different. Fuji doesn’t use the standard profiles that are with most cameras, instead basing their picture profiles on “simulations” of fuji film stocks, or at least based on those. In the case of Fuji cameras, the standard profile is “Provia” and this is what I set as the base level. However, again, you can get interesting results by using one of the other ones. For example, Velvia will give a vivid like effect, and Astia will have a similar effect as using “Portrait” or “Neutral” from the previous paragraph. If your camera supports it, Classic Chrome can have a very interesting effect. It seems to work particularly well with some of the presets in QuickLux 2 and FilmLux.

If you’re a Sony shooter, your camera also includes profiles that aren’t typical of the average DSLR. In particular “Clear” is an interesting profile. Using this has a similar effect to adding clarity to an image. It adds quite a lot of punch to an image, an can work well in conjunction with some of my more creative presets, such as FilmCandy or Coffee Tones.

Changing the colour profile

Changing the colour profile in Lightroom is pretty straightforward, and you probably already know how to do it. If you don’t, here’s a quick step by step guide.

  1. Go to the Develop module if you’re not already there.
  2. Scroll down to the Camera Calibration panel.
  3. Click on the Profile pop-up menu to select an alternative profile.

That’s it. If you want to change a few images at once, you can select multiple images and turn on the auto sync option that appears at the bottom of the adjustments list in the develop module, or alternatively you can just copy and paste the settings.

Here’s a short video showing this technique in action:

For more information on my presets, see the Lightroom Presets section of my Digital Download Store.

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F-Variations for Lightroom: Free Lightroom Presets for Fuji X-Series users

I’ve created a new set of presets for Fuji users and I’m happy to announce that I’m giving these away for free. Basically, I really like the various film simulation modes available on Fuji’s cameras, and the corresponding picture profiles in Lightroom. They’re good on their own, but they also make a good starting point for some further manipulation. So, using the various profiles as a starting point, I created my own set of “Variations” of these.

I first got the idea, when I created some variations of classic chrome. I added some contrast, clarity and so on, and did some curves tweaks, to create an enhanced version of classic chrome. When I did this, I then made a few more versions, and that was the start of it. I then did the same to many of the other modes, and ended up with a large collection of presets. I’m pretty happy with them too. Some are just adding extra “oomph” while others use film simulation techniques, and offer things like fading and tinting.

Free Lightroom Presets for Fuji Users Free Lightroom Presets for Fuji Users Free Lightroom Presets for Fuji Users _DSF3433

One word of warning though. Some of these presets will only work if you’re shooting with a camera that supports the corresponding film simulation mode. For example, to use the “Chrome” presets, your Fuji camera must support the “Classic Chrome” preset. Similarly, to use one of the Acros variations, your camera must support the Acros simulation mode (currently only the X-Pro 2 and the X-T2). These presets will not enable Classic Chrome or Acros on raw files from cameras that don’t support it.

Anyway, These are available now from here on the store, and they’re completely free. I hope you enjoy them, and please spread the word.

One thing I would ask, if you are sharing them, please share the link to the store page, and not the actual download. They are free, but they’re still my work and they’re still copyright.

Also, as these presets are offered for free we offer no support for their installation or use. However we do have an extensive set of Support documents and FAQ on our Help Centre page.

F-Variations - Free Lightroom Presets for Fuji X Users

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Some More Examples of FilmLUX in Action

Low Sun on Georgetown Street - FilmLUX Lightroom Presets

I wanted to demonstrate some examples of my recently announced Film Lux Lightroom presets in action on an actual project, so a recent trip into my archive provided a nice opportunity. I was going through some old images, and I was re-processing some that I wasn’t happy with originally.

This particular set is from a trip I trip I took to Washington DC a few years ago, and in particular to the beautiful suburb of Georgetown. It was late in the evening and it was a particularly beautiful sunny day. For the full story behind these images, see this post on my Photo Journal blog.

These photos are all processed using FilmLUX for Lightroom, and they are mostly using either the slide presets or the negative presets. I did some further tweaking using the additional grain presets supplied. Click on the image to view larger.

For more details on FilmLUX please see the product page here in the store.

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FilmLUX for Lightroom is now available

FilmLUX for Lightroom - Lightroom Presets

FilmLUX for Lightroom - Lightroom Presets

I’m delighted to announce, that after much delay, my latest set of Lightroom Presets, FilmLUX is now available. I came up with the idea for FilmLUX a little while ago when I was in the midst of scanning lots of old slide and transparency film. I noticed that the results I was getting had a really nice quality to them, and they weren’t quite like what I was getting from other presets. With this in mind I set about trying to create my own, paying close attention to the results I was getting from my own film scans.

The result is an artistic impression of the various film stocks I used to shoot with, rather than exact emulations. This set also contains an extensive collection of Grain presets presets to mimic the grain found in various types of film.

Here are a few samples of the presets in action:

FilmLUX for Lightroom is available now for €10 from right here on the digital download store. It’s available at a reduced price of €8 for the first week (until the end of July) and you can find more details and more samples over on the store’s product pages.

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How To See what Preset You’ve Previously Used in Lightroom

How To See what Preset You've Previously Used in Lightroom

If you’re a Lightroom user and you regularly use Lightroom presets, you may have come across this situation from time to time. You are looking back through some old images or projects, and you come across a photo that you like. You know you used a preset on it but you can’t remember which one. Luckily there’s a really easy way to find out.

First of all, this trick only works if you’re looking at the original file in Lightroom. If you’ve made a virtual copy of the image, and you’re looking at the copy this won’t work. However, if you’re dealing with the original file, here’s what to do:

  1. Go to the Develop Module
  2. On the left hand side of the screen, scroll down the panels, past your presets till you come to the history panel.
  3. Look down through your history. If you’ve applied a preset in the past, it will be listed here in this panel.

previous-preset-history

That’s pretty much all there is to it. What I’d really love to see is the ability to search across the history of all images in the library panel in the same way you search for other metadata. Then you could create a smart folder to you images on which you’ve used various Lightroom presets. Unfortunately that’s just a dream for now!