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New Creative Profiles Pack for Lightroom and Photoshop

I’m happy to announce that my newest product is now available. It is a set of creative profiles for use with Lightroom (version 7.3 or later) and Photoshop Camera RAW. “Creative Profile Pack One” is a set of 45 creative profiles for Lightroom and Photoshop.

Creative Profiles were introduced in Lightroom 7.3 and are a one-click way to apply a look to your image. Unlike a preset which adjusts the sliders in Lightroom, Creative Profiles behave more like an overall effect, and with a single button, apply all the adjustments. They have the additional advantage of allowing you to adjust the amount of the effect with a single slider. Creative profiles can also equally be applied to both Jpeg and RAW files.

The profiles in this pack are decided into three collections: Film Lux Profiles, TF-Colour and TF-Mono. Some of these are derived from my popular Lightroom presets but have been specially modified and enhanced so that they work better as Profiles.

CP1-Box.jpgFilm Lux Profiles are loosely based on my “Film Lux” presets, and provide an analogue film feel. TF-Colour contains a number of colour effects, including Vivid effects, and Warming and Cooling effects. They contain some looks inspired by my popular Landscape Gold and Bleached Bronze presets. TF-Mono contains a number of black and white profiles.

Creative Pack One is on sale now for €15 but for the rest of the month, it’s on sale for just €12 (until the 31st July). There are full details and some downloadable sample profiles for you to try on the product page.

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Introducing Alpine for Capture One

A few weeks ago when I launched Alpine for Lightroom, a few people wrote to me asking for a Capture One version. After some work and experimentation, I’m happy to announce that I now have a version of Alpine for Capture One. It’s not exactly the same as the Lightroom version due to the differences in how the software works, but it’s broadly similar. 

So what is Alpine? In a nutshell, Alpine for Capture One is a set of “Styles” that is designed to give your RAW images a stylised look. The idea for Alpine was to work with images of forests and mountains, to give the “woodsman” style of effect that is popular certain outdoor magazines. The styles generally work by enhancing the greens and browns in an image and are best suited to photos which contain a lot of these tones. Alpine is also designed to work best with lower contrast images, typically shot on misty or overcast days, although there are also some styles that will be better on sunnier, high contrast images too.

Porting these from Lightroom to Capture One was initially a little more difficult than I was expecting. The reason for this is that some adjustments, while they might have the same names, and broadly do the same thing, actually behave quite differently in different software. The other problem I have is that the starting point for different cameras in Capture One is much more variable than it is in Lightroom.

After a considerable amount of trial and error and tweaking various settings I managed to come up with a set that I was happy with, and captures the essence of the original idea behind Alpine. The Capture One version actually includes a few additional looks that weren’t in the originalLightroom version too, and overall, I think it’s a good package. While it is designed for a fairly narrow set of subjects, the styles should give you a pretty good starting point. 

Alpine for Capture One is available now. the regular price is €10 but for the first two weeks, it will be on sale for just €8 (until July 8th). To learn more about Alpine for Capture One, and to see some samples of the product in action, check out the product pages. This is my second set of Capture One presets, with the first being “Silver Lux”. 

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My new Fuji Jpeg Guide is now Available

I’m happy to announce that my latest in a series of guides for Fuji X-Series cameras is now available. The official title is “Fuji Jpegs: A Guide to Shooting and Processing” is a 76-page guide with tips and techniques for getting the best results when shooting with Fuji’s Jpeg engine.

The guide covers both things you can do in-camera and how to treat your images afterwards. I start by discussing why you would want to shoot JPEG in the first place. I outline some of the advantages and disadvantages of shooting the format, and I talk about the pros and cons of shooting Jpeg and RAW to separate cards on cameras with dual card slots.

I then talk about some of the settings that you can change in-camera on Fuji X-series cameras, how things like shadow tone and highlight tone work. I also discuss noise reduction and sharpening settings, and how to optimise the in-camera jpegs for post-production.

This is followed by some more general shooting tips, including how I have my own X-Pro 2 set up, and some tips for avoiding camera shake, how to focus on tricky subjects and so on. I also offer a series of recipes. These are basically some suggestions for combinations of settings that you can use to achieve various effects in-camera.

Finally, I look at some tips for processing Jpegs. I look at ways to sharpen Jpegs based on the settings I had previously suggested, and I look at some other tips and tricks for different software. Specifically, I deal with Lightroom, Photoshop and Apple Photos. I also discuss Fuji’s own X-Raw studio and how to generate new Jpegs from raw files in-camera. The guide also comes with some presets for Lightroom, designed to sharpen Jpegs and some Actions for Photoshop.

It’s the longest in this series of guides that I’ve written yet, and I hope people find it useful. I tried to pitch this guide at a broad audience in terms of experience level. I didn’t want to make it too “beginner” to put off more experienced readers, but I didn’t want to make it too advanced either. Similarly, it covers a broad range of topics, but I didn’t want to go too deep into any one, as not everyone has the same interests. It’s probably a little different from my other guides too, in that it focuses more on shooting rather than editing.

Anyway, I have been quite nervous about launching it, because it is a little different, but it’s done now, so it’s in the hands of the readers!

The guide will normally sell for €6.50 but I’m having a special launch price of €5 for the first two weeks. (The exact price depends on local Vat rates.) You can find out more details about it here on the store page, including a complete chapter breakdown, and a downloadable excerpt.

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Introducing Film Candy LUTS

I’m happy to introduce my first new digital product of 2018, and something that I’ve been working on for quite some time. Today I’m launching a new set of LUTs based on my “Film Candy” series of Lightroom presets. This set of 75 LUTs contains looks from both Film candy 1 and 2 and have been designed to be used in popular video applications as well as stills software such as Luminar 2018 and Photoshop.

To give you an idea of how these work in real life, I put together a little video showing the LUTs in action. This was created in FCPX 10.4 using he new built in LUT tool.

The History of Film Candy

Film Candy was the first digital product that I ever created, and it was originally developed for Apple’s Aperture. There were three releases of the original Aperture presets, and these were small packs containing a few presets each. When I switched entirely to Lightroom, I created Film Candy for Lightroom, which combines ideas from all three of the original Aperture versions, and creates similar looks for Lightroom.

These LUT versions of film candy are based on the Lightroom Presets of the same name, and are a collection of looks derived from both Film Candy 1 and Film Candy 2 for Lightroom.

Creating these was actually a little harder that I had anticipated. There are many tools available to convert Lightroom presets into LUTs but it turns out it’s not that straightforward. You need to use specific source images to make sure all colours are covered, and even then if you get some things wrong, you can make unusable LUTs. It took a lot of trial and error to get these right.

The LUTs are available now on my store for €25. Its a pretty big pack with 75 LUTs and it’s approximately a 150mb download. For the launch it will be on sale for €20 for the first two weeks.

(Price includes VAT based on the Irish vat rate, but will vary depending on your location. The store will show you the current price based on your local Vat rate. Outside the EU price will be shown exclusive of VAT)

To try out these LUTs and to make sure that the format works for you, I have created a sample pack with 5 LUTS from the overall pack for you to try. You can use this to make sure you can use these before you buy. The sample pack is available to download from the product page on the store.

Stay tuned to my YouTube channel too, I’ll have some more tutorials on how to use these in applications such as Final Cut Pro and Luminar soon.

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Capture One Styles in Action: SilverLux for Street Photography

Street Photo - Black and White With Capture One and SilverLUX

I was recently shooting some Street Photography with my Fuji X-Pro 2 and I was processing the images with Capture One. I was trying various different looks, but in the end I wanted to go with a black and white theme. As I already had a whole set of looks already created, with SilverLUX, I used this as the basis for the overall style of the images.

While there is a whole range of different effects available with Silver Lux, I ended up using a few of the styles the most often. These allowed me to create a consistent theme for the collection. In addition, I also used some of the grain presets that come with the pack in order to add a little stronger grain to the images. Below is a look at the final result, as well as a few before and after examples.

 

Silver LUX for Capture One is available now from right here on the store.

SilverLUX for Capture One is a set of “Styles” that are designed to give your RAW images a black and white effect. There are 25 Styles in total included with SilverLUX. The set also comes with a collection of 20 grain presets that makes use of Capture One’s excellent grain function to give you a range of grain options.

Buy Now

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My Presets for Aurora HDR now available

I’ve been working with the excellent AuroraHDR from MacPhun for some time now, and slowly I’ve been building a collection of presets to use with the software. I’m delighted to say that they’re now available. The pack includes a collection of 22 presets. The included looks are designed to cover a wide variety of styles, and include more traditional, artistic style looks as well as more natural looking styles. The pack also contains some presets designed to work with single image HDR files, and also some black and white HDR looks.

If you already have Aurora HDR, you can get the presets from here on my Digital Download store. If you don’t have the software already, and are interested, MacPhun are giving my readers a great deal, and you can get a bundle of the software and My Presets and get €20 off. The deal is available directly from their website.

The download includes a Pack of presets that can be installed into AuroraHDR. The pack contains 22 individual presets.

You can find out more on my Download Store. The pack is normally priced €10 but will be on sale for the fist two weeks for just €7 (Price may vary depending on your local VAT rate)

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Fujifilm X-Trans eBook Guide Bundle now Available

Based on popular request, I’ve created a bundle of all four of my current Fuji X-Trans post processing guides. The guides cover Capture One, Lightroom, Iridient Developer and Iridient X-Transformer. This bundle contains all 4 of these guides and is a little cheaper than buying them separately.

If you get the bundle you will receive individual PDFs along with the presets that are included with some of the Guides. All guides are formatted as PDF which you can print for your own personal use, or it can be read on an iPad or other device.

For more information or to get the bundle, see here on the store.

If you haven’t seen my guides before, here is an overview of the individual ebooks included in the bundle:

Workflow & Settings for Processing Fuji X-Trans Raw Files in Capture One PDF Guide

This is a PDF version of my online guide for processing X-Trans files in Capture One. This short guide attempts to cover the main settings that I use to get good results from Fuji X-Trans files. It is written specifically for Fuji X-Trans shooters who are using Capture One.

Format: PDF

Formatted Size: A4

Pages: 25

Learn more about this guide

Workflow and Settings For Processing Fuji X-Trans images in Lightroom

This guide looks at the many aspects of processing Fuji X-Trans images in Lightroom. It talks about what makes the X-Trans sensor unique, and how that affects post processing. It discusses working with RAW and JPEG files in Lightroom, and shows some strategies for managing both.

It also looks at how to get the best out of Fuji RAW files in Lightroom. It shows you how to mimic Fuji’s film simulations, and how to match Fuji’s dynamic range settings. Finally it covers sharpening X-Trans files in Lightroom and how to minimise artifacts and reduce some of the issues around Lightroom’s conversion of Fuji Raw files.

As a bonus, this guide also comes with my collected Fuji Lightroom presets, all in a single easy to find collection. These presets have been given away on my Blog in the past, and I’ve included them with this guide as a bonus so that you don’t have to download them separately.

Format: PDF

Formatted Size: US Letter 8.5″ X 11″

Pages: 48

Learn more about this guide

Processing X-Trans Images in Iridient Developer

This guide is designed to help you get the best results from processing Fuji X-Trans files in Iridient Developer. It is designed specifically for X-Trans shooters to tell you what you need to know to process your images in Iridient Developer.

Format: PDF

Formatted Size: 8.5″ X 11″

Pages: 68

Learn More

Processing Fuji X-Trans Files with Iridient X-Transformer and Lightroom

This guide is designed to help you understand and get the best results from using Iridient’s X-Transformer Software in Conjunction with Lightroom to process Fuji X-Trans raw files. While it may seem like a simple application, the number of parameters available make for a lot of possible options when using it. This guide aims to provide you with a roadmap through those options, and provided you with some recipes to get you started with the software.

Format: PDF

Formatted Size: 8.5″ X 11″

Pages: 30

Learn More

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My New Iridient X-Transformer Guide is now available

I’ve been promising this for a little while now, and I’m happy to announce that my guide for Iridient X-Transformer is now available. It took me a bit longer to get it finalised that I had thought because I kept doing different tests and tweaking the results and I also kept tweaking the text till I was happy. Called “Processing Fuji X-Trans Files with Iridient X-Transformer and Lightroom”, This guide is designed to help you understand and get the best results from using Iridient’s X-Transformer Software in Conjunction with Lightroom to process Fuji X-Trans raw files.

This guide is based on my own personal use and opinion. I wrote it because I like the software, and personally find it very useful. While it may seem like a simple application, the number of parameters available make for a lot of possible options when using it. This guide aims to provide you with a roadmap through those options, and provided you with some recipes to get you started with the software.

The guide is not too long, and is 30 pagers, broken down into 3 chapters and an introduction. It also contains a set of bonus Lightroom presets which are designed to work with some of the suggestions included in the book.

You can find full details on my store, including a low res version that you can page through to see what’s in the book before you buy it.

It’s on sale now for just €3 (Price may vary depending on your local VAT rate)

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FilmLUX 2 Now Available

I’m delighted to announce that my latest set of Lightroom Presets, FilmLUX 2 is now available. FilmLUX 2 was designed to create a subtle “film” like look to digital images, without them looking overly processed. With many presets, and even when processing manually, it can be easy to take your images too far and have them look like they’ve been heavily treated. With FilmLUX 2 I wanted to create a set of looks, that could enhance an image without it looking like you’ve done an extensive amount of work to it. while the images will still look treated, the effect won’t be too extreme.

There are twenty five different “looks’ in FilmLUX 2 and they are broken into three categories. There are five “chrome” like looks, which are based on an older type of transparency film, and have a reduced saturation for an aged effect. Secondly, there are ten “Vivid” style looks. With these, I wanted to create a vivid look that wasn’t too oversaturated, and still looked relatively natural. They also have a film like curve, ad tend to brighten the image a little, for that slightly pushed film look. Finally, there are ten “negative” effects. These have reduced saturation, raised blacks and a subtle roll off not he whites for a softer look. Each of the 25 main looks comes in two variations, one with grain (marked with a +G) and one without grain.

Here are some examples of FilmLUX2 in action:

FilmLUX 2 is available now for the special launch price of €8 (Normal price will be €10) Price depends on your local VAT rate. For full details and some more examples see the product pages on the store.

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Free Sample Pack of My Lightroom Presets

I have lots of Lightroom Presets available now on this store and I wanted to be able to give you a way to try some of them out, so I’ve put together a collection of presets taken from the various sets, to make a free sample pack.

This free set contains 20 Lightroom Presets selected from my different preset packs, so you can get a taste for the presets that I make.

The Presets Included are:

  • BleachedBronze: BleachedBronze02
  • BleachedBronze: BleachedBronze05-FadedBlue
  • Coffee Tones: Expresso
  • Film Lux: FL-Film Base-Slide 02
  • Film Lux: FL-Film-Base-Negative-02
  • Film Candy 2: Film Candy 2 – QTrans-Basic01
  • Film Candy 2: Film Candy 2 QNeg-Basic02
  • Film Candy: Film-Candy-Marshmallow
  • Film Candy: Film-Candy-Plain Chocolate DR
  • Landscape Gold: Landscape Gold 14ct Lite +V
  • Landscape Gold: Landscape Gold 9ct Medium
  • Monolith: Monolith 12 – Faces
  • QuickLux: Quick Lux – FL-Film Base Slide 01
  • Steely Blue: Steely Blue Lite
  • Steely Blue: Steely Blue Polarised V
  • T-Pan: T-PAN01
  • T-Pan: T-PAN02 400
  • Vivid Extreme: Vivid Cityscape Blue
  • Vivid Extreme: Vivid Texture
  • MonoLux: MonoLux 4 – Flesh Tones

If you’ve been curious about my Lightroom presets before, but wanted to get a taste before buying, I’m happy to oblige. I had actually been wanting to do this for some time, but I’m only getting around to it now. You can get the free sample pack from my store, as well as see more information about what’s included.

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New Black and White Lightroom Preset Bundle Available

New Monochrome Lightroom Preset Bundle Available

I currently have three sets of black and white presets available for Lightroom and based on popular request, I’m now making them available as a single bundle. The three sets of presets are: Monolith, MonoLux and T-Pan. Each has a different style and different approach to creating the black and white look, and together I think they make a good range of styles for creating black and white images in Lightroom.

The bundle contains the following three sets:

Monolith

Monolith is a more stylised set of black and white looks. The results you get from Monolith are typically the high contrast type of black and white Image that’s popular with some street photographers.

MonoLux

MonoLux is a more varied set of styles and is more filmic than Monolith. The set was designed with the aim of creating a rich but natural black and white filmic feel.

T-Pan

T-Pan for Lightroom is a more film like set and is a more subtle look than the other two packs. The look is aiming to re-create the experience of shooting with a professional grade black and white film stock, and creates a rich film like monochrome image.

I think the bundle is a good deal too. It could normally be €28 to buy them all separately, and with this bundle you can get them for just €20, so you’re basically getting one of the sets for free.

(Note that the price includes VAT which can change depending on your country of origin, so the price may vary depending on where you are)

You can see the bundle now here on the digital download store, which also shows some samples and links to the original presets which has more details.

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Capture One X-Trans Guide Updated

My guide for processing X-trans files in Capture One was actually the first of these series of guides that I produced. Since I’ve written it, the software has been updated several times, and Fuji has come out with newer cameras. I had previously added a supplement to the ebook to cover the X-Pro 2 because at the time support was still preliminary (it still is in a way). I’ve now updated the Capture One guide to include the previous supplement and I’ve also incorporated some tips for working with Capture One 10.

The update is free if you’ve already bought the existing Guide. To get the updated version just log into your account on my store, and look under your downloads. You should see the updated version there. For more instructions, see this short article on my Help Centre.

As I wrote when I talked about Capture One Pro 10 previously, it’s becoming difficult to update the guide without doing a complete re-write because of the ongoing changes in the software. With that in mind, this will be the last version of this book in its current form. I may do a completely new book for Capture One 10 at some point, and if I do it will be more comprehensive and more detailed, because it will be specific to that version.

I have tried to keep the current version of the guide (i.e. this new update) relevant regardless of which version of Capture One that you are using, with specifics for Capture One 9 and 10 where relevant.

If you haven’t seen the Capture One guide before, you can find it in my Download store. To celebrate the launch of the updated version I’m putting it on sale, and educing the already low cost to just €3 (depending on your local Vat rate)