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My new Fuji Jpeg Guide is now Available

I’m happy to announce that my latest in a series of guides for Fuji X-Series cameras is now available. The official title is “Fuji Jpegs: A Guide to Shooting and Processing” is a 76-page guide with tips and techniques for getting the best results when shooting with Fuji’s Jpeg engine.

The guide covers both things you can do in-camera and how to treat your images afterwards. I start by discussing why you would want to shoot JPEG in the first place. I outline some of the advantages and disadvantages of shooting the format, and I talk about the pros and cons of shooting Jpeg and RAW to separate cards on cameras with dual card slots.

I then talk about some of the settings that you can change in-camera on Fuji X-series cameras, how things like shadow tone and highlight tone work. I also discuss noise reduction and sharpening settings, and how to optimise the in-camera jpegs for post-production.

This is followed by some more general shooting tips, including how I have my own X-Pro 2 set up, and some tips for avoiding camera shake, how to focus on tricky subjects and so on. I also offer a series of recipes. These are basically some suggestions for combinations of settings that you can use to achieve various effects in-camera.

Finally, I look at some tips for processing Jpegs. I look at ways to sharpen Jpegs based on the settings I had previously suggested, and I look at some other tips and tricks for different software. Specifically, I deal with Lightroom, Photoshop and Apple Photos. I also discuss Fuji’s own X-Raw studio and how to generate new Jpegs from raw files in-camera. The guide also comes with some presets for Lightroom, designed to sharpen Jpegs and some Actions for Photoshop.

It’s the longest in this series of guides that I’ve written yet, and I hope people find it useful. I tried to pitch this guide at a broad audience in terms of experience level. I didn’t want to make it too “beginner” to put off more experienced readers, but I didn’t want to make it too advanced either. Similarly, it covers a broad range of topics, but I didn’t want to go too deep into any one, as not everyone has the same interests. It’s probably a little different from my other guides too, in that it focuses more on shooting rather than editing.

Anyway, I have been quite nervous about launching it, because it is a little different, but it’s done now, so it’s in the hands of the readers!

The guide will normally sell for €6.50 but I’m having a special launch price of €5 for the first two weeks. (The exact price depends on local Vat rates.) You can find out more details about it here on the store page, including a complete chapter breakdown, and a downloadable excerpt.

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X-Trans Capture One Guide Updated with Supplement for 10.1

When Capture One was recently updated to 10.1 they made some significant changes to the way X-Trans files are supported. I have been in a bit of a quandary as to what to do about my Capture One X-Trans guide. I originally wrote this quite some time ago now, and it was several versions ago. I have kept updating it, but it was getting a bit messy. I am planning to do a completely new version, for just 10.1, and structuring the guide differently. However, I didn’t want to leave existing readers hanging either. With that in mind I’ve created a supplement for 10.1 and it is included free with the existing guide.

The supplement includes information on updates for 10.1 as well as a set of new sharpening and noise reduction settings. I’ve decided to include these as presets, and these presets are also included as a download with the supplement. These were designed for 10.1 but will work with version 10 too. Most of the new document is details on how to download, install and use these presets. I also have some information on using the Analyse function for chromatic aberration, and I’ve also added details and a link to my video for getting and installing colour profiles.

The supplement and presets are free for current owners of my Capture One guide, as well as owners of the Bundle. To get the additional downloads, you just need to go to your account on my store, and under the downloads section, you will see the new presets and supplement for 10.1 . If you need more detailed instructions for finding the updates, I have more information on my help centre.

This will be the last update to the current guide. I have started working on the new Capture One eBook, which may take a few months to fully write, but I will keep you updated when it is close to release.

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My New Iridient X-Transformer Guide is now available

I’ve been promising this for a little while now, and I’m happy to announce that my guide for Iridient X-Transformer is now available. It took me a bit longer to get it finalised that I had thought because I kept doing different tests and tweaking the results and I also kept tweaking the text till I was happy. Called “Processing Fuji X-Trans Files with Iridient X-Transformer and Lightroom”, This guide is designed to help you understand and get the best results from using Iridient’s X-Transformer Software in Conjunction with Lightroom to process Fuji X-Trans raw files.

This guide is based on my own personal use and opinion. I wrote it because I like the software, and personally find it very useful. While it may seem like a simple application, the number of parameters available make for a lot of possible options when using it. This guide aims to provide you with a roadmap through those options, and provided you with some recipes to get you started with the software.

The guide is not too long, and is 30 pagers, broken down into 3 chapters and an introduction. It also contains a set of bonus Lightroom presets which are designed to work with some of the suggestions included in the book.

You can find full details on my store, including a low res version that you can page through to see what’s in the book before you buy it.

It’s on sale now for just €3 (Price may vary depending on your local VAT rate)

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Capture One X-Trans Guide Updated

My guide for processing X-trans files in Capture One was actually the first of these series of guides that I produced. Since I’ve written it, the software has been updated several times, and Fuji has come out with newer cameras. I had previously added a supplement to the ebook to cover the X-Pro 2 because at the time support was still preliminary (it still is in a way). I’ve now updated the Capture One guide to include the previous supplement and I’ve also incorporated some tips for working with Capture One 10.

The update is free if you’ve already bought the existing Guide. To get the updated version just log into your account on my store, and look under your downloads. You should see the updated version there. For more instructions, see this short article on my Help Centre.

As I wrote when I talked about Capture One Pro 10 previously, it’s becoming difficult to update the guide without doing a complete re-write because of the ongoing changes in the software. With that in mind, this will be the last version of this book in its current form. I may do a completely new book for Capture One 10 at some point, and if I do it will be more comprehensive and more detailed, because it will be specific to that version.

I have tried to keep the current version of the guide (i.e. this new update) relevant regardless of which version of Capture One that you are using, with specifics for Capture One 9 and 10 where relevant.

If you haven’t seen the Capture One guide before, you can find it in my Download store. To celebrate the launch of the updated version I’m putting it on sale, and educing the already low cost to just €3 (depending on your local Vat rate)

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Sony A6000 Post Processing Guide for Lightroom Now Available

I’m very pleased to announce, that after a very long time in production, my newest guide is now available. this e-book guide is called “Processing Sony A6000 Raw files in Lightroom: A Workflow and settings guide”. While that’s probably a bit of a mouthful, it pretty much sums up what this new guide is about. In the same way that I have previously written guides for Fuji X-Series shooters, this guide is designed specifically for Sony A6000 shooters who want to get the best from their camera when processing their images in Lightroom.

While working with Sony RAW files in Lightroom may seem like a fairly straightforward process, there are lots of things that you can do to optimise your workflow. This guide will look at all these things, and give you the knowledge you need to get the best from your Sony RAW files, no matter what the situation.

This guide also includes a set of develop module presets for Lightroom. These cover some of the subjects and settings that are covered in the guide.

What’s it all about then?

The guide is 58 pages long and here’s a breakdown of what topics are covered in the guide, by chapter:

Chapter 1: RAW vs JPEG vs RAW + JPEG

The A6000 will let you shoot in three different formats. You can choose to shoot just JPEGs, just RAW files, or RAW and JPEG. In this chapter I discuss the merits of shooting RAW + JPEG and I discuss workflows for managing both in Lightroom. I also briefly discuss Sony’s compressed raw format and some of the controversy surrounding it

Chapter 2: Setting Basic Settings and Creating an Import Preset

If you’re shooting RAW files with the A6000, you may be disappointed when you first import them into Lightroom, especially if you’ve been looking at the JPEG output on your camera. The reason for this is that JPEG files have the contrast, colour settings and so on baked into the file.

There are ways to minimise this discrepancy, and that’s what this chapter is about. By creating a basic setup that sets a “base level” for your RAW files, it will save you a lot of work in the future and it will also mean that your images look better out of the camera when you first import them into Lightroom. With a few tweaks, you should see a big difference.

In this section I’m going to show you what to change to create a default setup, and how to save those changes as a preset to apply to imports in the future. I’m also going to show you the settings I use and recommend, which are included with this guide as a preset that you can try for yourself.

Chapter 3: Fixing Common Problems

In this chapter I look at how to address a number of issues that commonly crop up when processing RAW files from the Sony A6000. While many of these topics are common to all cameras, this chapter will approach the subject with a focus on how they affect images taken with the A6000 specifically.

Chapter 3 looks at the following issues that can occur with your images and ways to approach dealing with those problems:

• Correcting white balance and how white balance affects images.

• Tinting shadows and highlights.

• Fixing colour fringing.

• Manually setting distortion options.

• Fixing banding.

• Fixing shadow noise with photoshop.

Chapter 4: Creative Adjustments

In this chapter we look at some of the ways that you can creatively adjust your images in Lightroom. While this could be a book all of its own, we focus on some of the adjustments that you can make to match the in-camera options. In particular we look at creating black and white images, matching the adjustments available for the picture controls, and expanding the dynamic range, similar to the camera’s DRO settings. We also discuss shooting and processing HDR Images.

Processing Sony A6000 Raw files in Lightroom: A Workflow and settings guide is available now for just €5 and for the first two weeks it will be at a special launch price of just €4. The guide is in PDF format and also contains some presets.

For more details see the full product description here in the digital download store. You can also download a sample PDF of the first chapter.

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My Guide for Processing Fuji X-Trans files in Lightroom Now Available

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As many of my long time readers and followers will know, I’ve posted lots of articles and blog posts on this site over the years about processing Fuji X-Trans files. Over the last few years, I’ve covered lots of different aspects, and I have quite a bit of information on here. I’ve been working to collate all those separate blog posts into a single guide (well, a guide for each application) and I’ve previously posted my guide for working with Capture One. Since that time I’ve been hard at work on the guide for Lightroom, and I’m delighted to say that it’s finally finished and available on the store!

In the past I’ve talked extensively about some of the issues with Lightroom’s rendering of Fuji Files. I know some people have an issue with having an issue with it, but I’ve tried to discuss it as fairly and as inoffensively as possible, while still acknowledging hat there is a problem there, and depending on your type of photography this may or may not be an issue for you. I talk about ways to minimise the detail issue in the guide.

I’ve actually put this project off in the past numerous times because of my hope that Adobe would improve the processing, and it has improved over the years. At least now they have acknowledged the detail rendering issue and are working on a fix. I’ve decided to go ahead with the guide anyway, because I think it will be useful to people in the mean time, and I’ll update it (for free) when the improved processing is eventually released.

I cover more than just the fine detail rendering and sharpening though. Here’s a quick breakdown of what else is in it:

  1. What Makes the X-Trans Sensor Unique: I discuss how the Fuji sensor is different from other camera sensors, and I talk about how this affects post processing
  2. Managing RAW + JPEG files: As many Fuji shooters like to shoot JPEG as well as RAW I discuss strategies and tips for managing both as well as how to set up Lightroom to bring in RAW + JPEG pairs.
  3. Matching the Film Simulation modes. I show you how to match the in-camera Film simulation modes with camera profiles in Lightroom, and how to create presets to use on import
  4. Matching the Dynamic Range settings: I show you how to match Fuji’s Dynamic Range settings, and I discuss how the in-camera ones work and what that means when working with RAW files.
  5. Sharpening: I discuss sharpening in detail. I cover techniques for sharpening X-Trans files. These are the same techniques that I use in my X-Trans sharpening presets (which I’ve included with the guide for convenience). I also talk briefly about outputting for the web, and how sharpening can affect that.

The guide is 30 pages long and I’ve included a whole bunch of presets with it too. Again, these are ones that have been on my site, but are in lots of different places. I’ve put them all together into a single download to make things easier.

The guide is available now for just €4 It’s a little more expensive than the Capture One guide as it’s quite a bit longer. I’ve also decided not to do a free online version this time, but instead publish a series of excerpts.

(I’ve previously published an excerpt already, from a work in progress version of the section on matching Dynamic Range settings. You can see it here. Note that this is an earlier draft)

The reason for this is twofold. I wrote it in a certain way, and converting it into a web version is just too much work at this time. I’ve already put a lot into it, and I’m kind of exhausted from it. I have put up an excerpt though as a watermarked PDF of the first 13 pages, (the link is in the description section) and I have posted thumbnails of the whole document. I will post more excerpts on the blog in the future too.